Blog Tour Book Review: Red Leaves by Paullina Simons

About Red Leaves

• Paperback: 448 pages
• Publisher: William Morrow Paperbacks; Reissue edition (April 11, 2017)

In the tradition of Ira Levin’s A Kiss Before Dying and Donna Tartt’s The Secret History comes a suspenseful thriller from the international bestselling author of The Bronze Horseman—an utterly captivating story about four Ivy League students whose bizarre friendship leads to a twisted maze of secrets, lies, betrayal, and murder.

As the star player of Dartmouth College’s women’s basketball team, Kristina Kim is beautiful, intelligent, and fearless. But though she’s just 21, Kristina has already had her share of heartache, loss, and dark secrets that haunt her. She’s best friends with Conni, Albert, and Jim, but the only one who seems to really know her is Albert. With long dark hair, tattoos, and a rebellious streak, Albert doesn’t fit in with the rest of the clean-cut Ivy Leaguers. Like Kristina, he has his share of secrets—secrets that are beginning to unravel this intimate circle of friends.

One wintry Thanksgiving weekend tragedy strikes…

When Detective Spencer O’Malley goes to investigate something suspicious at the foot of a steep hill on Dartmouth’s campus, he doesn’t expect that the frozen, naked body found in deep snow would belong to Kristina Kim—the remarkable young woman he met recently who entranced him. Now Spencer will never know if the chemistry he had with her was real. All he can do is find her killer.

Spencer is pulled into the strange, complex web of the surviving friends. Many important questions about Kristina’s murder cannot be answered, such as: why did none of them report her missing for nine days before her body was discovered? The more Spencer digs, the more clear it becomes that each of the three has a motive for killing Kristina. And as Spencer, seeking justice for a dead girl, is led down a labyrinth of deceit, every new revelation proves more shocking than the last….and more dangerous.

“Simons handles her characters and setting with a certain skill, creating mystery from the ordinary, protected lives of these Ivy League kids, slowly peeling away their deceptions to reveal denial, cowardice, and chilling indifference…an engrossing story.”—Publishers Weekly

Purchase Links

HarperCollins | Amazon | Barnes & Noble

 

I received a copy of this book from the publisher through TLC Book Tours in exchange for an honest review of it.

In Red Leaves we meet Kristina Kim – star basketball player, dog owner, long time girlfriend and best friend. Beneath the surface of Kristina and her group of friends are betrayal, forbidden love and a mountain of secrets. When a students body is found on campus, all the secrets are brought to light.

Red Leaves is my second read written by Paulina Simons, although both were in two different genres. I find it fascinating when an author can successfully write in multiple genres like Paulina can.

That being said, Red Leaves drew me in with the Prologue but lost me somewhere in the beginning of Part One. For the first 100 and so pages, I was tempted to DNF it but I’m a completionist and I like to give books chances. Part One was definitely lost to me, it was slow and not much really happened, although after finishing and being able look back at the story and how it unfolded I can see why Part One was included as it provides background and knowledge about the characters and their relationships that really does serve to make us think certain ways as the mystery of the “whodunnit” unravels. 

The story definitely picks up in Part Two and finally caught my interest a little more and I was glad to be experiencing the story from a fresh perspective,  once that happened the rest of the book went by quickly and I actually ended up liking it after all. One thing I really enjoyed about thus book was that I always doubted my guesses about “whodunnit”. Always. It was never predictable for me.

Overall, I gave this book three stars, it may not have been exactly  for me but I did find some enjoyment in it. If you like a slow paced mystery you may want to give this book a read but if you are into fast paced thrillers, this may not be your taste. Paullina Simons writing in this book was just as good as I remember in the last book of hers I read, I hear people discuss a few of her books and I am still planning on reading some more of her work. 

Happy reading everyone!

Photo by Renaissance Studio

About Paullina Simons

Paullina Simons is an internationally bestselling author whose novels include Bellagrand and The Bronze Horseman was born in Leningrad in 1963. As a child she immigrated to Queens, New York, and attended colleges in Long Island. Then she moved to England and attended Essex University, before returning to America. She lives in New York with her husband and children.

Find out more about Paullina at her website, follow her on Twitter, and connect with her on Facebook.

Blog Tour Book Review: The Women in the Castle by Jessica Shattuck

About The Women in the Castle

• Hardcover: 368 pages
• Publisher: William Morrow (March 28, 2017)

Three women, haunted by the past and the secrets they hold

Set at the end of World War II, in a crumbling Bavarian castle that once played host to all of German high society, a powerful and propulsive story of three widows whose lives and fates become intertwined—an affecting, shocking, and ultimately redemptive novel from the author of the New York Times Notable Book The Hazards of Good Breeding.

Amid the ashes of Nazi Germany’s defeat, Marianne von Lingenfels returns to the once-grand castle of her husband’s ancestors, an imposing stone fortress now fallen into ruin following years of war. The widow of a resister murdered in the failed July 20, 1944, plot to assassinate Adolf Hitler, Marianne plans to uphold the promise she made to her husband’s brave conspirators: to find and protect their wives, her fellow resistance widows.

First Marianne rescues six-year-old Martin, the son of her dearest childhood friend, from a Nazi reeducation home. Together, they make their way across the smoldering wreckage of their homeland to Berlin, where Martin’s mother, the beautiful and naive Benita, has fallen into the hands of occupying Red Army soldiers. Then she locates Ania, another resister’s wife, and her two boys, now refugees languishing in one of the many camps that house the millions displaced by the war.

As Marianne assembles this makeshift family from the ruins of her husband’s resistance movement, she is certain their shared pain and circumstances will hold them together. But she quickly discovers that the black-and-white, highly principled world of her privileged past has become infinitely more complicated, filled with secrets and dark passions that threaten to tear them apart. Eventually, all three women must come to terms with the choices that have defined their lives before, during, and after the war—each with their own unique share of challenges.

Written with the devastating emotional power of The Nightingale, Sarah’s Key, and The Light Between Oceans, Jessica Shattuck’s evocative and utterly enthralling novel offers a fresh perspective on one of the most tumultuous periods in history. Combining piercing social insight and vivid historical atmosphere, The Women in the Castle is a dramatic yet nuanced portrait of war and its repercussions that explores what it means to survive, love, and, ultimately, to forgive in the wake of unimaginable hardship.

Purchase Links

HarperCollins | Amazon | Barnes & Noble

Happy Thursday everyone! I hope your week has been wonderful thus far! I have had a crazy busy week with work and school (even though I had most of Monday off this week! The good news: I’m not sick anymore! Also good news: I am having a wonderful time reading some really great books.

This week I had the pleasure of reading The Women in the Castle by Jessica Shattuck. I received an ARC from the publisher through TLC Book Tours in exchange for my honest review of it.

The Women in the Castle is a historical fiction novel set in the period around and during World War II. It is told in the alternating perspectives of multiple characters in the story, men and women but really centers around a group of women who find themselves raising their children together in a castle, their husbands dead and just trying to survive and build a life. That is all I will say about the events of the book as I do not want to give spoilers!

So I ended up giving this book a 4.5 out of 5 star rating. I enjoyed reading it although it definitely was hard for me to read it at times as most stories that take place in this time period are just because they tend to have some really heartbreaking but important content. This book was no different in that respect, there was definitely some heartbreaking and terribly tragic events that transpired but it was also interesting, suspenseful and at times hopeful.

This was the first book I have read that shows the events of WWII through the eyes of German citizens who were staunchly against Hitler’s ideals and regime from the start. It also showcased the perspectives of people who were very pro Hitler from the beginning which evolved into them realizing too late what they were actually supporting.   It was just a very interesting and affecting story. WWII stories for me are always glimpses of the absolute worst of humanity with pockets of goodness shining through like the people who opposed such cruelty and tried against all odds to save lives. I think the author treated really difficult themes really well.

The only thing I had a little bit of a hard time with was the timeline. I love stories with multiple perspectives but this one also had an alternating timeline where it wasn’t told in a straight line type of narrative but rather, it jumped around and back and forth through time. It wasn’t super difficult for me to follow but I can see how it might be difficult for some readers. It did help that the dates are provided but I found myself having to back track and connect the years and months to create a picture of the timeline in my mind to make sure I was getting events in the right order.

I loved the writing and I empathized with all of the characters and felt especially connected to Benita and Martin – what they go through and where they end up. There were alot of pieces of this story that were gut wrenching for me, I didn’t need to put the book down which is something I find myself doing every now and then with WWII books that include descriptions of human cruelty to the Jews but I did have to close my eyes, take a deep breath and move forward. Things that also affected me in this story were the sexual slavery of women in wartime, cruelty to children and some things I consider examples of animal cruelty.

I love reading books in this style that show the affects of WWII on the lives of so many and the evolution of their life and beliefs throughout. I definitely recommend this book to readers that love historical fiction or are interested in reading more historical fiction based in WWII.

Photo by Lesley Unruh

About Jessica Shattuck

Jessica Shattuck is the award-winning author of The Hazards of Good Breeding, which was a New York Times Notable Book and finalist for the PEN/Winship Award, and Perfect Life. Her writing has appeared in the New York Times, New Yorker, Glamour, Mother Jones, Wired, and The Believer, among other publications. A graduate of Harvard University, she received her MFA from Columbia University. She lives with her husband and three children in Brookline, Massachusetts.

Find out more about Jessica at her website and connect with her on Facebook.

tlc logo

Blog Tour Book Review: The Drifter by Christine Lennon

About The Drifter

• Paperback: 384 pages
• Publisher: William Morrow Paperbacks (February 14, 2017)

Megan Abbott meets M.O. Walsh in Christine Lennon’s compelling debut novel about a group of friends on the cusp of graduating from college when their lives are irrevocably changed by a brutal act of violence.

Present Day…

For two decades, Elizabeth has tried to escape the ghosts of her past…tried to erase the painful memories…tried to keep out the terrifying nightmares. But twenty years after graduating from the University of Florida, her carefully curated life begins to unravel, forcing her to confront the past she’s tried so hard to forget.

1990s, Gainesville, Florida…

Elizabeth and her two closest friends, Caroline and Ginny, are having the time of their lives in college—binge watching Oprah, flirting for freebies from Taco Bell, and breaking hearts along the way. But without warning, their world is suddenly shattered when a series of horrific acts of violence ravage the campus, changing their lives forever.

Sweeping readers from the exclusive corners of sorority life in the South to the frontlines of the drug-fueled, slacker culture in Manhattan in the ‘90s and early ‘00s, when Elizabeth is forced to acknowledge her role in the death of a friend in order to mend a broken friendship and save her own life, The Drifter is an unforgettable story about the complexities of friendships and the secrets that can ultimately destroy us.

Purchase Links

HarperCollins | Amazon | Barnes & Noble

Happy Thursday!! It’s almost the weekend which makes me incredibly be happy because I am planning to do some well deserved reading! 

Today I am taking part in the blog tour for The Drifter by Christine Lennon. I received a free copy in exchange for my honest review of it. 

The Drifter is a thriller about a girl named Betsy who lives and goes to college in a somewhat small town. During the events of this book there is a killer on the loose in her town that is murdering young women in their apartments so it sends their campus and town into high alert.

I ended up giving this book a 3 star review. I liked it and it was certainly a little creepy in my opinion. I read the brunt of it in bed at two in the morning with all the lights off and my husband and puppy asleep so that definitely increased the creep factor for me. There were some definite creepy moments that made my skin crawl which is something I look for in a thriller read. However, it was a little slow for me. The prologue definitely caught my attention and I liked the writing style and thought it was atmospheric. I think all the sorority stuff lost me and the general girl versus girl cattiness that goes on in this book. 

I did find it interesting to explore the evolution of Betsy through time. During her college days she’s very carefree, independent and bold, but after what happens she becomes understandably fearful, dependent and protective. 

Overall it was a fast, entertaining read that thriller fans may enjoy. I recommend reading it in bed at night with the lights off (except for your reading light!)

About Christine Lennon

CHRISTINE LENNON is a Los Angeles based writer. Before she moved to the West Coast and started her freelance career, she was an editor at W, Vogue, and Harper’s Bazaar. Since then, she has written for publications including, T, the New York Times Style Magazine; the Wall Street Journal; Town & Country; W; Vogue; Harper’s Bazaar; Martha Stewart Living; Sunset; C California Style; Marie Claire; Self; Net-a-Porter’s Porter and The Edit online magazine—among others. Christine lives in California with her husband, Andrew Reich, and their twins. The Drifter is her first book.

Find out more about Christine at her website.

tlc logo

Blog Tour Book Review: The Other Widow by Susan Crawford

the-other-widow-coverAbout The Other Widow

Paperback: 352 pages
Publisher:
William Morrow Paperbacks (December 6, 2016)

The author of The Pocket Wife explores the dark side of love, marriage, and infidelity in this sizzling novel of psychological suspense.

Everybody’s luck runs out. This time it could be theirs . . .

It isn’t safe. That’s what Joe tells her when he ends their affair moments before their car skids off an icy road in a blinding snowstorm and hits a tree. Desperate to keep her life intact – her job, her husband, and her precious daughter, Lily & Dorrie will do everything she can to protect herself, even if it means walking away from the wreckage. Dorrie has always been a good actress, pretending to be someone else: the dutiful daughter, the satisfied wife, the woman who can handle anything. Now she’s going to put on the most challenging performance of her life. But details about the accident leave her feeling uneasy and afraid. Why didn’t Joe’s airbag work? Why was his car door open before the EMTs arrived? And now suddenly someone is calling her from her dead lover’s burner phone. . . .

Joe’s death has left his wife in free fall as well. Karen knew Joe was cheating, she found some suspicious e-mails. Trying to cope with grief is devastating enough without the constant fear that has overtaken her, this feeling she can’t shake that someone is watching her. And with Joe gone and the kids grown, she’s vulnerable . . . and on her own.

Insurance investigator Maggie Brennan is suspicious of the latest claim that’s landed on her desk, a man dying on an icy road shortly after buying a lucrative life insurance policy. Maggie doesn’t believe in coincidences. The former cop knows that things and people are never what they seem to be.

As the fates of these three women become more tightly entwined, layers of lies and deception begin to peel away, pushing them dangerously to the edge . . . closer to each other . . . to a terrifying truth . . . to a shocking end.

Add to Goodreads badge

Purchase Links

HarperCollins |Amazon| Barnes & Noble

Good afternoon and welcome to my stop on the blog tour for The Other Widow by Susan Crawford. I received a copy of this book from the publisher through TLC Book Tours in exchange for my honest review.

The Other Widow is a thriller that centers around three women and an unexpected death that connects them all and leads to many unanswered questions and the uncovering of many, many lies.

I really liked the premise for this book so I was excited to read it. Thrillers, for me, tend to be pretty quick reads because I get really into them and can’t put them down until I’m finished. I read this book in a single day so it’s definitely plausible to read in one sitting. The plot itself was interesting and had many layers, which was the main thing I was excited for. I didn’t guess the whodunit right away but it did cross my mind once or twice but I sort of explained it away in my head until it was revealed. It was definitely an interesting story, it kept my interest and when I was reading at night I found myself a little more jumpy than usual while reading it.

I am giving this book a 3.5 out of 5 star rating. I liked it and enjoyed it. I am not used to the writing style so it threw me off a little while reading it. It is written with a lot of fragmented sentences which I think works for the pacing and the tone of a thriller. I don’t know if it was just me, but for some reason I wasn’t really feeling it. It took away from the story for me. I did like that the story was delivered in three perspectives, that was really enjoyable for me, getting to see the story as it unfolded through different angles. After reading this I am still a little confused over Karen and Tomas and the conclusion there. I think maybe because the ending seemed to come so fast, after the rest of the novel had sort of a slower build up since we were given time to peel back layers and work through things with the characters.

If you love thrillers, I think this one is worth a read…especially in this weather where it gets darker early and you can snuggle up in blankets with a warm drink and just read a thriller that may or may not freak you out. That’s totally what I did while reading this book!

I hope everyone is having a great week so far, happy reading everyone!

About Susan Crawford

Susan Crawford grew up in Miami, Florida, and graduated from the University of Miami with a BA in English and a minor in psychology. She later moved to New York City and then Boston before settling in Atlanta to raise three daughters and work in the field of adult education. A member of the Atlanta Writers Club and the Village Writers, Susan teaches at Georgia Piedmont Technical College and dabbles in local politics. She lives with her husband and a trio of rescue cats in Atlanta, where she enjoys reading books, writing books, rainy days, and spending time with the people she loves.

Find out more about Susan at her website, and connect with her on Facebook and Twitter.

tlc logo

Blog Tour Book Review: Yesternight by Cat Winters

yesternight-coverAbout Yesternight

� Paperback: 400 pages
� Publisher: William Morrow Paperbacks (October 4, 2016)

From the author of The Uninvited comes a haunting historical novel with a compelling mystery at its core.� A young child psychologist steps off a train, her destination a foggy seaside town. There, she begins a journey causing her to question everything she believes about life, death, memories, and reincarnation.

In 1925, Alice Lind steps off a train in the rain-soaked coastal hamlet of Gordon Bay, Oregon. There, she expects to do nothing more difficult than administer IQ tests to a group of rural schoolchildren. A trained psychologist, Alice believes mysteries of the mind can be unlocked scientifically, but now her views are about to be challenged by one curious child.

Seven-year-old Janie O�Daire is a mathematical genius, which is surprising. But what is disturbing are the stories she tells: that her name was once Violet, she grew up in Kansas decades earlier, and she drowned at age nineteen. Alice delves into these stories, at first believing they�re no more than the product of the girl�s vast imagination.� But, slowly, Alice comes to the realization that Janie might indeed be telling a strange truth.

Alice knows the investigation may endanger her already shaky professional reputation, and as a woman in a field dominated by men she has no room for mistakes. But she is unprepared for the ways it will illuminate terrifying mysteries within her own past, and in the process, irrevocably change her life.

Add to Goodreads badge

Purchase Links

HarperCollins | Amazon | Barnes & Noble

Happy Tuesday everyone! I am happy to bring you my review of Yesternight by Cat Winters. I received this book from the publisher Harper Collins through TLC Book Tours in exchange for my honest review of it.

Yesternight is a historical fiction story about a young trained psychologist, Alice Lind, who travels the country testing children’s educational aptitude for the department of education. On her current assignment she meets an extraordinary young girl who seems to have the knowledge and memory of someone twice her age, quite literally claiming to have lived another life. Meeting her sends Alice on a hunt for answers, not only for the child and her family, but also for herself.

Yesternight wasn’t quite what I was expected it to be, which turned out to be a wonderfully good thing. I definitely wasn’t expecting to react to it the way I did. When I finally read this book, it had been months since I had last read the synopsis so I went into my read of it with fresh eyes and no clue as to what to expect, other than the front cover as a clue. I was way off judging from the cover. I expected a women’s historical fiction book. While I definitely got that in this book, it was actually so much more than that. It was unexpectedly creepy, which was awesome for an October read! I don’t know if this book was meant to be chilling and suspenseful but I read this book between the hours of 12 and 4 in the morning with the rest of the house asleep and all the lights off (except my handy dandy book light) and it was definitely a bit creepy! Aside from that, this was a wonderful read. It definitely dealt in the realm of women’s fiction as our main character, Alice, is  working in a predominantly male profession and is struggling with the preferential treatment of men in her field and in academia. She is very much an independent, modern woman in command of her own sexuality which I loved to see in this book.

I just really loved that this story was so layered. We have that women’s fiction layer but deeper than that there is this mystery/thriller beneath the surface that I did not expect but was fascinated by. This was a thrilling, entertaining story that I would highly recommend to historical fiction or mystery fans alike. Loved this book, I could not put it down! A five star read!

Photo by Tara Kelly

Photo by Tara Kelly

About Cat Winters

Cat Winters’s debut novel, In the Shadow of Blackbirds, was released to widespread critical acclaim. The novel has been named a finalist for the 2014 Morris Award, a�School Library Journal Best Book of 2013, and a Booklist 2013 Top 10 Horror Fiction for Youth. Winters lives in Portland, Oregon, with her husband and two children.

Find out more about Cat at her website, and follow her on tumblr, Pinterest, Instagram,�Facebook, and Twitter.

tlc logo

Blog Tour Book Review: The Bookshop on the Corner by Jenny Colgan

the-bookshop-on-the-corner-coverAbout The Bookshop on the Corner

• Paperback: 368 pages
• Publisher: William Morrow Paperbacks (September 20, 2016)

“Losing myself in Jenny Colgan’s beautiful pages is the most delicious, comforting, satisfying treat I have had in ages.”—Jane Green, New York Times bestselling author of Summer Secrets

Nina Redmond is a literary matchmaker. Pairing a reader with that perfect book is her passion… and also her job. Or at least it was. Until yesterday, she was a librarian in the hectic city. But now the job she loved is no more.

Determined to make a new life for herself, Nina moves to a sleepy village many miles away. There she buys a van and transforms it into a bookmobile—a mobile bookshop that she drives from neighborhood to neighborhood, changing one life after another with the power of storytelling.

From helping her grumpy landlord deliver a lamb, to sharing picnics with a charming train conductor who serenades her with poetry, Nina discovers there’s plenty of adventure, magic, and soul in a place that’s beginning to feel like home… a place where she just might be able to write her own happy ending.

Add to Goodreads badge

Purchase Links

HarperCollins | Amazon | Barnes & Noble

images

Happy Monday! I hope everyone had wonderful weekend! As for me, I spent the weekend in the company of a good book!  I received this book for review from HarperCollins and TLC Book Tours.

The Bookshop on the Corner is a contemporary fiction book about a librarian who gets laid off from her small library. In a rare flash of bravery and at the shock of her friends, she buys a van and moves to Scotland to open a mobile bookshop. Unsure of how and where she is going to live when she gets there, she is in for quite a ride.

My Sunday was literally spent with my nose in this book. I finished it in one sitting, I just couldn’t bear to put it down. I’m getting ready to enter my last semester of library school and I probably should have known that I would connect with this character so much by her choice of profession but it’s really ridiculous how much I loved our main character.

I pretty much loved almost everything about this book. At first I wasn’t used to the writing but as I got used to it, it just pulled me in and quite literally never let me go. The plot itself was simple and not overdone or cheesy which I think would have been easy to do here but it was perfectly done.

I loved Scotland as the setting and now I seriously want to go there. This book gave me a bunch of feels with the romance story lines in this book. I loved that there was a really good balance between the elements of this story. There was romance, self discovery, humor and even some thrilling bits. Sometimes I catch myself thinking ahead as I am reading but I was NEVER bored or trying to guess what was going to happen next, I just went with it because I was so lost in this story. I just have to say that it had everything I love in a romance, kind of the Darcy  and Elizabeth feel.

I’m giving a well deserved five stars to this book as I loved it so much. It’s one of my favorites this year and I’m going to treasure having it on my shelf and will probably reread it at some point in the future. It was charming, warm and gave me the fuzzies! I highly recommend it for anyone looking for a good contemporary fiction read with a bit of romance to read this fall. It’s a perfect fall read to curl up with!

 

images

jenny-colgan-apAbout Jenny Colgan

Jenny Colgan is the New York Times bestselling author of numerous novels, including Little Beach Street Bakery, Christmas at Rosie Hopkins’ Sweetshop, and Christmas at the Cupcake Café, all international bestsellers. Jenny is married with three children and lives in London and Scotland.

Find out more about Jenny at her website, and connect with her on Facebook and Twitter.

tlc logo

Blog Tour Book Review: The Hating Game by Sally Thorne

The Hating Game coverAbout The Hating Game

• Paperback: 384 pages
• Publisher: William Morrow Paperbacks (August 9, 2016)

Debut author Sally Thorne bursts on the scene with a hilarious and sexy workplace comedy all about that thin, fine line between hate and love.

Nemesis (n.) 1) An opponent or rival whom a person cannot best or overcome.

                       2) A person’s undoing

                       3) Joshua Templeman

Lucy Hutton and Joshua Templeman hate each other. Not dislike. Not begrudgingly tolerate. Hate. And they have no problem displaying their feelings through a series of ritualistic passive aggressive maneuvers as they sit across from each other, executive assistants to co-CEOs of a publishing company. Lucy can’t understand Joshua’s joyless, uptight, meticulous approach to his job. Joshua is clearly baffled by Lucy’s overly bright clothes, quirkiness, and Pollyanna attitude.

Now up for the same promotion, their battle of wills has come to a head and Lucy refuses to back down when their latest game could cost her her dream job…But the tension between Lucy and Joshua has also reached its boiling point, and Lucy is discovering that maybe she doesn’t hate Joshua. And maybe, he doesn’t hate her either. Or maybe this is just another game.

Add to Goodreads badge

Purchase Links

HarperCollins | Amazon | Barnes & Noble

images

It’s Monday!! Today I’m fortunate to share my review of a really good book! I’d like to start off by sending a big thank you to the author, TLC Book Tours and the publisher Harper Collins for giving the chance to read this book in exchange for an honest review of it.

The Hating Game is a contemporary romance about two people who can’t stand each other, Lucinda and Joshua. They both work at a publishing company that is headed by two co-CEOs and they are basically rivals; each other’s polar opposite. This game of rivalry has been going on since day one. They exchange banter all day that is witty, biting and often borders on flirtation. But the two are convinced of their long time hate for the other and it seems to spin into overdrive when they are pitted against the other for a promotion. With this new development and also their not so subtle flirtation, the game just gets a little more intense every day.

I haven’t read a contemporary romance in quite awhile although I have been itching to read one (evidence of this exists on my bookshelf right this moment). When I first read about The Hating Game it sounded like it would be a fun read for the summer and  I loved that it was described as a rom com. I don’t read many rom coms but I am definitely a rom com movie fan!

I was hooked from the beginning of this book. I loved pretty much everything about it…I loved the writing, the characters, the pacing of the plot. It is straightforward, hilarious, witty and most importantly, biting. I love these characters. I loved the dynamic between our two main characters right away. Their banter is super entertaining and super hot! They were like the modern Darcy and Elizabeth if they had met in the workplace and had rival careers. Their banter just reminded me of that sort of dynamic – which is one that I love.

I definitely was not expecting to love this book to the degree that I did. It was a super fun read that kept me ripping through the pages, totally a “read in one sitting” kind of book. It was really fast paced. It’s 363 pages but it didn’t feel that way because how fast the plot moved which kept me up reading all night because the sauciness of these character was just off the charts.This may actually be my most favorite read of this year. I think this book has some of the best sexual tension between characters that I have read thus far. I also didn’t expect it to be as funny as it was. I found myself giggling out loud and I HAD to put it down a few times and gush to my husband about how good it was.

I want this book to be a movie. Hollywood please make this a movie and cast either Emma Roberts or Anna Kendrick as Lucinda. I’m not sure who I would pick to play Joshua…maybe Liam Hemsworth?

If you are a contemporary romance fan, do yourself a favor and pick up this book now! You will not be sorry, it is awesome! I HIGHLY recommend giving this a read if you are looking for a great contemporary romance read. The author’s next book is coming out in 2017 and I will be highly anticipating it! Sally Thorne is definitely an author to watch. Five stars!

P.S. This book is beautiful. I love the cover design and the colors that were used.It’s super attractive and cute and it’s one of those floppy, soft matte covers that is so comfortable to read. Love it!

images

 

Photo credit Katie Saarikko

Photo credit Katie Saarikko

About Sally Thorne

Sally Thorne lives in Canberra, Australia and spends her days writing funding submissions and drafting contracts (yawn!) so it’s not surprising that after hours she climbs into colorful fictional worlds of her own creation. Sally believes that romance readers are always searching for intensity in their next favorite book—and it isn’t always so easy to find. The Hating Game is her first novel.

Follow Sally on Facebook and Twitter.

tlc logo