Blog Tour Book Review: The Mermaid’s Daughter by Ann Claycomb

About The Mermaid’s Daughter

• Paperback: 448 pages
• Publisher: William Morrow Paperbacks (March 7, 2017)

A modern-day expansion of Hans Christian Andersen’s The Little Mermaid, this unforgettable debut novel weaves a spellbinding tale of magic and the power of love as a descendent of the original mermaid fights the terrible price of saving herself from a curse that has affected generations of women in her family.

Kathleen has always been dramatic. She suffers from the bizarre malady of experiencing stabbing pain in her feet. On her sixteenth birthday, she woke screaming from the sensation that her tongue had been cut out. No doctor can find a medical explanation for her pain, and even the most powerful drugs have proven useless. Only the touch of seawater can ease her pain, and just temporarily at that.

Now Kathleen is a twenty-five-year-old opera student in Boston and shows immense promise as a soprano. Her girlfriend Harry, a mezzo in the same program, worries endlessly about Kathleen’s phantom pain and obsession with the sea. Kathleen’s mother and grandmother both committed suicide as young women, and Harry worries they suffered from the same symptoms. When Kathleen suffers yet another dangerous breakdown, Harry convinces Kathleen to visit her hometown in Ireland to learn more about her family history.

In Ireland, they discover that the mystery—and the tragedy—of Kathleen’s family history is far older and stranger than they could have imagined.  Kathleen’s fate seems sealed, and the only way out is a terrible choice between a mermaid’s two sirens—the sea, and her lover. But both choices mean death…

Haunting and lyrical, The Mermaid’s Daughter asks—how far we will go for those we love? And can the transformative power of music overcome a magic that has prevailed for generations?

Purchase Links

HarperCollins | Amazon | Barnes & Noble

Happy Monday!! I hope everyone had a wonderful weekend! I was actually laid up in bed for most of it, sick. Luckily I had my dog and a great book to keep me company!

Over the weekend I read The Mermaids Daughter by Ann Claycomb. I received a free copy of this book from the publisher through TLC Book Tours. 

This book tells the story of Kathleen who has been plagued by a phantom pain in her feet and her tongue since she was little. Her mother suffered from this as well, but killed herself when Kathleen was still little. Kathleen, now an adult and an opera singer, struggles with this and travels with her partner to the country of her ancestry to find out more about herself and this issue that she is having. It is the story of multiple generations of women suffering with this curse because of the decision of one woman. It is based off the Hans Christian Anderson’s Little Mermaid tale.

In this story our main character is in a relationship with Harry, a woman she met in a vocal course in college. I love their relationship dynamic and the way in which they care for each other. Harry knows about the pain Kathleen endures, she plays the dual roles of lover and caretaker for Kathleen and sort of begins the quest to find out more about Kathleen’s situation. I enjoyed the chapters we got from her perspective and seeing Kathleen and what she goes through, through her eyes. I enjoyed pretty much all of the characters in this story and I was especially intrigued by ALL of the perspectives the story is delivered from.

I loved this book immediately and could not put it down. I love dark retellings and this was definitely dark. It was dark, atmospheric, musical, and beautifully written. I felt like I was there. Kathleen’s suffering was palpable, I could almost feel it myself. Exactly how I would imagine it in our world. This was a great blend of genre – contemporary with fantasy.  The writing was gorgeous and it seemed like every sentence was evocative of the sea.

This was an excellent debut and I cannot wait to see what else this author has in store for us. Whatever it is, I will be eagerly anticipating it.

I highly recommend to everyone but especially to readers that love retellings, especially darker ones. Five stars!

 

Photo by Brian Persinger

About Ann Claycomb

Ann Claycomb’s fiction has been published in American Short Fiction, Zahir, Fiction Weekly, Brevity, Hot Metal Bridge, The Evansville Review, Title Goes Here, and other publications. She has twice been nominated for a Pushcart Prize and has an MFA in fiction from West Virginia University

Blog Tour Book Review: The Drifter by Christine Lennon

About The Drifter

• Paperback: 384 pages
• Publisher: William Morrow Paperbacks (February 14, 2017)

Megan Abbott meets M.O. Walsh in Christine Lennon’s compelling debut novel about a group of friends on the cusp of graduating from college when their lives are irrevocably changed by a brutal act of violence.

Present Day…

For two decades, Elizabeth has tried to escape the ghosts of her past…tried to erase the painful memories…tried to keep out the terrifying nightmares. But twenty years after graduating from the University of Florida, her carefully curated life begins to unravel, forcing her to confront the past she’s tried so hard to forget.

1990s, Gainesville, Florida…

Elizabeth and her two closest friends, Caroline and Ginny, are having the time of their lives in college—binge watching Oprah, flirting for freebies from Taco Bell, and breaking hearts along the way. But without warning, their world is suddenly shattered when a series of horrific acts of violence ravage the campus, changing their lives forever.

Sweeping readers from the exclusive corners of sorority life in the South to the frontlines of the drug-fueled, slacker culture in Manhattan in the ‘90s and early ‘00s, when Elizabeth is forced to acknowledge her role in the death of a friend in order to mend a broken friendship and save her own life, The Drifter is an unforgettable story about the complexities of friendships and the secrets that can ultimately destroy us.

Purchase Links

HarperCollins | Amazon | Barnes & Noble

Happy Thursday!! It’s almost the weekend which makes me incredibly be happy because I am planning to do some well deserved reading! 

Today I am taking part in the blog tour for The Drifter by Christine Lennon. I received a free copy in exchange for my honest review of it. 

The Drifter is a thriller about a girl named Betsy who lives and goes to college in a somewhat small town. During the events of this book there is a killer on the loose in her town that is murdering young women in their apartments so it sends their campus and town into high alert.

I ended up giving this book a 3 star review. I liked it and it was certainly a little creepy in my opinion. I read the brunt of it in bed at two in the morning with all the lights off and my husband and puppy asleep so that definitely increased the creep factor for me. There were some definite creepy moments that made my skin crawl which is something I look for in a thriller read. However, it was a little slow for me. The prologue definitely caught my attention and I liked the writing style and thought it was atmospheric. I think all the sorority stuff lost me and the general girl versus girl cattiness that goes on in this book. 

I did find it interesting to explore the evolution of Betsy through time. During her college days she’s very carefree, independent and bold, but after what happens she becomes understandably fearful, dependent and protective. 

Overall it was a fast, entertaining read that thriller fans may enjoy. I recommend reading it in bed at night with the lights off (except for your reading light!)

About Christine Lennon

CHRISTINE LENNON is a Los Angeles based writer. Before she moved to the West Coast and started her freelance career, she was an editor at W, Vogue, and Harper’s Bazaar. Since then, she has written for publications including, T, the New York Times Style Magazine; the Wall Street Journal; Town & Country; W; Vogue; Harper’s Bazaar; Martha Stewart Living; Sunset; C California Style; Marie Claire; Self; Net-a-Porter’s Porter and The Edit online magazine—among others. Christine lives in California with her husband, Andrew Reich, and their twins. The Drifter is her first book.

Find out more about Christine at her website.

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Blog Tour Book Review: The Possessions by Sara Flannery Murphy

About The Possessions

• Hardcover: 368 pages
• Publisher: Harper (February 7, 2017)

“I was totally immersed in the strange, beautiful world of Sara Flannery Murphy’s The Possessions. A gripping, chilling read that’s part love story, part mystery, and completely original, it’s sensuous, scary, and utterly thrilling. I’ve never read anything quite like it.” —Anton DiSclafani, author of The Yonahlossee Riding Camp for Girls

“An enthralling meditation on grief and memory cloaked in suspenseful psychodrama, The Possessions dissolves the boundaries of past and present and artfully, heartbreakingly maps the consequences of transgressive desire. Sara Flannery Murphy has written the best kind of ghost story.” —Robin Wasserman, author of Girls on Fire

In this electrifying literary debut, a young woman who channels the dead for a living crosses a dangerous line when she falls in love with one of her clients, whose wife died under mysterious circumstances.

In an unnamed city, Eurydice works for the Elysian Society, a private service that allows grieving clients to reconnect with lost loved ones. She and her fellow workers, known as “bodies”, wear the discarded belongings of the dead and swallow pills called lotuses to summon their spirits—numbing their own minds and losing themselves in the process. Edie has been a body at the Elysian Society for five years, an unusual record. Her success is the result of careful detachment: she seeks refuge in the lotuses’ anesthetic effects and distances herself from making personal connections with her clients.

But when Edie channels Sylvia, the dead wife of recent widower Patrick Braddock, she becomes obsessed with the glamorous couple. Despite the murky circumstances surrounding Sylvia’s drowning, Edie breaks her own rules and pursues Patrick, moving deeper into his life and summoning Sylvia outside the Elysian Society’s walls.

After years of hiding beneath the lotuses’ dulling effect, Edie discovers that the lines between her own desires and those of Sylvia have begun to blur, and takes increasing risks to keep Patrick within her grasp. Suddenly, she finds her quiet life unraveling as she grapples not only with Sylvia’s growing influence and the questions surrounding her death, but with her own long-buried secrets.

A tale of desire and obsession, deceit and dark secrets that defies easy categorization, The Possessions is a seductive, absorbing page-turner that builds to a shattering, unforgettable conclusion.

Purchase Links

HarperCollins | Amazon | Barnes & Noble

 I received a free ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review of it.

The Possessions is about a girl named Eurydice, or Edie, who works as a body. People discreetly hire her to channel their dead loved ones. They literally inhabit her body for a short period of time. She has been working in this industry for years and has been successful due to her being able to disconnect from her body and clients during these sessions. Until she meets the one client and his late wife that seem to continuously inhabit not just her thoughts, but her body as well. The book explores the mystery surrounding her death, Edie’s past and the death of Hopeful Doe – the moniker given to an unknown girl whose body was found in an abandoned house close to Edie’s work. 

When I read the first paragraph  of this book I was hooked and immediately thrust into this story. For me, it was immediately reminiscent of Atwood’s, A Handmaids Tale. It had a similar atmosphere, although not so much in the latter portion of the book. I fell in love with the writing in this book. I thought it was gorgeous and atmospheric – perfect for this type of story. 

The concept itself is one that I found to be wholly fascinating. I am not very familiar with mediums but I imagine this is somewhat similar although this seemed more on the possession side, hence the title. I found a lot about this book to be very compelling like the black market movement of this type of service vs the legit service given by organization like Elysian Fields, morality issues and this society’s views on death. 

This book was really fascinating to me and made me think about death in a few different ways. I was not expecting that from this book. I admit that I was immediately drawn in by the cover because it is absolutely gorgeous but it was a completely different book than I thought. I was very pleasantly surprised. I have a hard time placing this book in a particular genre as the author melded different aspects of many genres in this one story – mystery, obsessive romance and a somewhat dystopian feel. I had a few tiny issues with it that were far overshadowed by my overall experience with this book. It was a little slow  at times and I craved more detail about certain things. When I finished this book I definitely wanted more of it. I read this book with a glass of wine after a long day of work and I enjoyed it so so much. 

The story  was fascinating, shocking, interesting, provocative and eerie all in one breath. This is a debut novel and since it was so great, I can’t wait for more from Sara Flannery Murphy. 5 stars! 

About Sara Flannery Murphy

Sara Flannery Murphy grew up in Arkansas, where she divided her time between Little Rock and Eureka Springs, a small artists’ community in the Ozark Mountains. She received her MFA in creative writing at Washington University in St. Louis and studied library science in British Columbia. She lives in Oklahoma with her husband and son. The Possessions is her first novel.

Find out more about Sara at her website, and connect with her on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram.

Blog Tour Book Review: The Odds of You and Me by Cecilia Galante

About The Odds of You and Me

• Paperback: 384 pages
• Publisher: William Morrow Paperbacks (January 31, 2017)

In the vein of Meg Donohue and Sarah Jio, Cecilia Galante’s second novel delivers the powerful story of one young woman who’s faced with an impossible choice—one that could have her making the biggest mistake of her life.

Thirteen days. That’s all Bernadette, “Bird,” Sincavage has left to go until she’s done with her probation and can be free again. Free from making payments to the supermarket she wrote bad checks to. Free from living at home with her overzealous mother who’s constantly nagging her about attending church again. Free to give her four-year-old son, Angus, the normal life he deserves. Her impending freedom and move to Moon Lake, where she’s plunked down a deposit on a brand new apartment, is so close she can almost taste it. What trouble could she possibly get into in just thirteen days?

But trouble does follow in the form of James Rittenhouse—someone she worked with a few years ago. At first, Bird is stunned to see James make the evening news when he’s arrested for assaulting someone in a local bar. But that’s nothing compared to the shock she gets when she discovers James hiding out in an abandoned church choir loft. Somehow he escaped police custody, broke his leg, and got his hand on a gun, which he’s now pointing at her.

Although Bird doesn’t tell anyone she saw James, there’s no way she’s helping him. She can’t screw up her probation or her second chance for a new future. And she has her son’s welfare to think about. Still. If only she could stop thinking about the terrified look in James’ eyes and the fact that he’s hurt. If only she could forget that once, long ago, James helped her out, and she owes him a debt like no other.

Will Bird jeopardize her future for someone who helped her out in the past? A past that holds secrets she’s not quite sure she’s ready to face? Or will she turn a blind eye and learn to live with the consequences?

Purchase Links

HarperCollins | Amazon | Barnes & Noble

Happy Tuesday!! Welcome to my stop on the blog tour for The Odds of You and Me by Cecilia Galante. I would like to send a big thank you to TLC Book Tours, the author and the publisher Harper Collins for giving me the opportunity read this book in exchange for an honest review of it.

The Odds of You and Me follows the story of Bird who after getting caught and punished for writing bad checks, finally has a shot at creating a better, independent life for her and her five year old son. When Bird runs in to an old friend who is currently on the wrong side of the law and needs her help, she faces the decision on whether or not to let him into her life, an unknown variable thrown in her way just when all the other pieces have started to fall into place.

When I received this ARC in the mail, I had already forgotten what this book was about so I basically went into this story not knowing what to expect or prepared at all for what I found in it’s pages. Immediately upon starting to read it, I was drawn to the story and to the characters, specifically Bird. I enjoyed her development throughout the story so much and it was just interesting to see how her thought process worked as she struggled with the big decisions she needed to make and with her feelings as a person, daughter and mother wove together. Her motivations and her struggles were very real to me. I loved her as a real person who makes makes real mistakes and as a mother who has this beautiful love for her son.

I think what drew me completely into this book and held me there for the duration, was the fantastic writing. This is my first Cecilia Galante book and I definitely want to read more from her. I was drawn into the story from start to finish, I couldn’t put it down. Four stars and a recommend! 

About Cecilia Galante

Cecilia Galante, who received an M.F.A. in Creative Writing from Goddard College, Vermont, is the author of eightyoung adult novels and a children’s chapter-book series. She has been the recipient of many awards, including an NAIBA Best Book of the Year, and an Oprah’s Teen Read Selection for her first novel, The Patron Saint of Butterflies. She lives in Kingston, Pennsylvania with her three children.

Find out more about Cecilia at her website, and connect with her on Facebook and Twitter.

Blog Tour Book Review: This is Not Over by Holly Brown

About This is Not Over

• Paperback: 400 pages
Publisher: William Morrow Paperbacks; Reprint edition (January 17, 2017)

You’ll have your deposit within seven business days, just like it says on Getaway.com. I’ve put through a refund to your credit card for the full amount, minus $200 to replace the stained sheets…

Miranda

When 30-year-old Dawn reads Miranda’s email, she sees red. People have always told Dawn she’s beautiful, and she just hopes they don’t see beneath—to how she grew up, to what she’s always tried to outrun. She revels in her getaways with her perfect (maybe too perfect) husband, the occasional long weekend in luxurious homes, temporarily inhabiting other people’s privileged lives. Miranda’s email strikes a nerve, with its lying intimation that Dawn is so dirty you need to throw out her sheets.

Beware of your “host”

I wouldn’t have left a review at all, if I didn’t feel it was my civic duty to warn others…

57-year-old Miranda thought she’d seen it all, but she can’t believe her eyes when she reads Dawn’s review. She’s a doctor’s wife but she needs that rental money, desperately. People might think her life is privileged, but they don’t know what’s really going on. They don’t know about her son. She won’t take this threat to her livelihood—to her very life—lying down.

Two very different women with this in common: Each harbors her own secret, her own reason why she can’t just let this go. Neither can yield, not before they’ve dredged up all that’s hidden, even if it has the power to shatter all they’ve built.

This is not over.

This is so not over.

Purchase Links

HarperCollins | Amazon | Barnes & Noble

Happy Thursday! I’m excited because tomorrow is Friday and also because I’ve been reading some pretty great books so far this year. That always makes me happy!

I just finished This Is Not Over by Holly Brown. I’d like to thank both TLC Book Tours and Harper Collins for giving me the chance to be a part of this book tour and read the book in exchange for an honest review of it.

This Is Not Over told in the alternating perspectives of our two main characters Dawn and Miranda. When the story starts Dawn and her husband have just returned from vacationing in Santa Monica where they rented Miranda’s home for a short while. Not satisfied with the rental and incensed by an email she has received from Miranda advising that she would be deducting the cost of ruined sheets from Dawn’s security deposit, Dawn decides to leave a review of the rental (and the owner) on the site she booked it on. This is the start of a furious back and forth between both women and it quickly becomes personal.

I wasn’t sure at all what to expect from this story. When I read the description, it intrigued me instantly and I just really wanted to see what it was all about and upon reading the premise, where the story would go. I did read a few reviews for it and saw it had mixed reviews so I was nervous going into it but I ended up really liking it. I was not a fan of either main character but that didn’t stop me from being able to enjoy the story.

I really liked the short chapters and the mix of formats used in this book, it was a pretty fast read for me once I got settled and buried my nose in it. I went into this book thinking that it was a psychological thriller and I think that may be where people are getting confused, it’s more of a light suspense novel I would say. I definitely would not try to compare this to some of the heavy psychological thrillers that are out there because if you expect that of course, you will be disappointed when you don’t get that. It definitely is a book that keeps you on your toes just interested in what these characters are going to do to each other next, it kept me wondering what was going to happen and where the story was going. Although I didn’t love either character, I was interested in what they did and seeing the inner workings of their brains, the assumptions and misunderstandings they made.

Overall, I thought this was an entertaining read. I think fans of reality TV, specifically the housewives shows, might really enjoy this book. These two characters are VERY dramatic and take things really personal, although they both do have some very serious things going on in their lives so I can kind of see why they’re fixating on this one thing. It’s something they are both fighting to control and everything just spins out of whack. When you sit there and read it, it seems so ridiculous but it is actually something that could very well happen in real life which is why I really liked it.

3.5 stars

About Holly Brown

Photo by Yanina Gotsulsky

Holly Brown lives with her husband and toddler daughter in the San Francisco Bay Area, where she’s a practicing marriage and family therapist. She is the author of the novel Don’t Try to Find Me, and her blog, “Bonding Time,” is featured on the mental health website PsychCentral.com.

Connect with Holly on Facebook.

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Blog Tour Book Review: The Other Widow by Susan Crawford

the-other-widow-coverAbout The Other Widow

Paperback: 352 pages
Publisher:
William Morrow Paperbacks (December 6, 2016)

The author of The Pocket Wife explores the dark side of love, marriage, and infidelity in this sizzling novel of psychological suspense.

Everybody’s luck runs out. This time it could be theirs . . .

It isn’t safe. That’s what Joe tells her when he ends their affair moments before their car skids off an icy road in a blinding snowstorm and hits a tree. Desperate to keep her life intact – her job, her husband, and her precious daughter, Lily & Dorrie will do everything she can to protect herself, even if it means walking away from the wreckage. Dorrie has always been a good actress, pretending to be someone else: the dutiful daughter, the satisfied wife, the woman who can handle anything. Now she’s going to put on the most challenging performance of her life. But details about the accident leave her feeling uneasy and afraid. Why didn’t Joe’s airbag work? Why was his car door open before the EMTs arrived? And now suddenly someone is calling her from her dead lover’s burner phone. . . .

Joe’s death has left his wife in free fall as well. Karen knew Joe was cheating, she found some suspicious e-mails. Trying to cope with grief is devastating enough without the constant fear that has overtaken her, this feeling she can’t shake that someone is watching her. And with Joe gone and the kids grown, she’s vulnerable . . . and on her own.

Insurance investigator Maggie Brennan is suspicious of the latest claim that’s landed on her desk, a man dying on an icy road shortly after buying a lucrative life insurance policy. Maggie doesn’t believe in coincidences. The former cop knows that things and people are never what they seem to be.

As the fates of these three women become more tightly entwined, layers of lies and deception begin to peel away, pushing them dangerously to the edge . . . closer to each other . . . to a terrifying truth . . . to a shocking end.

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Purchase Links

HarperCollins |Amazon| Barnes & Noble

Good afternoon and welcome to my stop on the blog tour for The Other Widow by Susan Crawford. I received a copy of this book from the publisher through TLC Book Tours in exchange for my honest review.

The Other Widow is a thriller that centers around three women and an unexpected death that connects them all and leads to many unanswered questions and the uncovering of many, many lies.

I really liked the premise for this book so I was excited to read it. Thrillers, for me, tend to be pretty quick reads because I get really into them and can’t put them down until I’m finished. I read this book in a single day so it’s definitely plausible to read in one sitting. The plot itself was interesting and had many layers, which was the main thing I was excited for. I didn’t guess the whodunit right away but it did cross my mind once or twice but I sort of explained it away in my head until it was revealed. It was definitely an interesting story, it kept my interest and when I was reading at night I found myself a little more jumpy than usual while reading it.

I am giving this book a 3.5 out of 5 star rating. I liked it and enjoyed it. I am not used to the writing style so it threw me off a little while reading it. It is written with a lot of fragmented sentences which I think works for the pacing and the tone of a thriller. I don’t know if it was just me, but for some reason I wasn’t really feeling it. It took away from the story for me. I did like that the story was delivered in three perspectives, that was really enjoyable for me, getting to see the story as it unfolded through different angles. After reading this I am still a little confused over Karen and Tomas and the conclusion there. I think maybe because the ending seemed to come so fast, after the rest of the novel had sort of a slower build up since we were given time to peel back layers and work through things with the characters.

If you love thrillers, I think this one is worth a read…especially in this weather where it gets darker early and you can snuggle up in blankets with a warm drink and just read a thriller that may or may not freak you out. That’s totally what I did while reading this book!

I hope everyone is having a great week so far, happy reading everyone!

About Susan Crawford

Susan Crawford grew up in Miami, Florida, and graduated from the University of Miami with a BA in English and a minor in psychology. She later moved to New York City and then Boston before settling in Atlanta to raise three daughters and work in the field of adult education. A member of the Atlanta Writers Club and the Village Writers, Susan teaches at Georgia Piedmont Technical College and dabbles in local politics. She lives with her husband and a trio of rescue cats in Atlanta, where she enjoys reading books, writing books, rainy days, and spending time with the people she loves.

Find out more about Susan at her website, and connect with her on Facebook and Twitter.

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Blog Tour Book Review: Hidden Figures by Margot Lee Shetterly

hidden-figures-pb-coverAbout Hidden Figures

• Paperback: 368 pages
• Publisher: William Morrow Paperbacks (December 6, 2016)

The phenomenal true story of the black female mathematicians at NASA whose calculations helped fuel some of America’s greatest achievements in space. Soon to be a major motion picture starring Taraji P. Henson, Octavia Spencer, Janelle Monae, Kirsten Dunst, and Kevin Costner.

Before John Glenn orbited the earth, or Neil Armstrong walked on the moon, a group of dedicated female mathematicians known as “human computers” used pencils, slide rules and adding machines to calculate the numbers that would launch rockets, and astronauts, into space.

Among these problem-solvers were a group of exceptionally talented African American women, some of the brightest minds of their generation. Originally relegated to teaching math in the South’s segregated public schools, they were called into service during the labor shortages of World War II, when America’s aeronautics industry was in dire need of anyone who had the right stuff. Suddenly, these overlooked math whizzes had a shot at jobs worthy of their skills, and they answered Uncle Sam’s call, moving to Hampton, Virginia and the fascinating, high-energy world of the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory.

Even as Virginia’s Jim Crow laws required them to be segregated from their white counterparts, the women of Langley’s all-black “West Computing” group helped America achieve one of the things it desired most: a decisive victory over the Soviet Union in the Cold War, and complete domination of the heavens.

Starting in World War II and moving through to the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement and the Space Race, Hidden Figures follows the interwoven accounts of Dorothy Vaughan, Mary Jackson, Katherine Johnson and Christine Darden, four African American women who participated in some of NASA’s greatest successes. It chronicles their careers over nearly three decades they faced challenges, forged alliances and used their intellect to change their own lives, and their country’s future.

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Purchase Links

HarperCollins | Amazon | Barnes & Noble

Hello everyone, happy Wednesday! Thanks for stopping in on my stop for the blog tour for Hidden Numbers. I received a copy from the publisher through TLC Book Tours in exchange for an honest review. 

Hidden Numbers is a nonfiction work that tells the story of a group of African American women whom worked for NASA as mathematicians. Their story has been a lesser known story even though they played such a pivotal, important role in United States space exploration history, literally calculating the trajectories that sent astronauts into space. 

When I first signed up to take part in this tour, I had no clue that a film was coming out based on this book and the work of these amazing women.  I ended up seeing the trailer randomly and it floored me! How had I never known this essential part of history?!

I loved this book. Not only did I learn a lot while reading it, it was also very inspiring and moving. It’s evident in the writing and the detail included how much research went into this book and the result is an in depth look at a piece of history that we didn’t know we were missing but are so glad to have brought to light. There were so many different interesting aspects of this book. These women are incredible and brave, as are each of their stories. They were women working in a male dominated industry at a time when that wasn’t really done, especially in that particular industry. Not only were they women but they were also black women and this was during the time of the civil rights movement, so with just those two key pieces of information you can see just how important and awesome their work and their situation was. 

I am so glad that I read this book and I recommend it to everyone. It’s such an important piece of history, and it’s just fascinating to read about what these women did…I mean without them many things would not have been possible and it’s extremely maddening that their story is barely coming to light and I can’t wait to see the movie based on this book. These women definitely came alive through the pages of this book so it will be incredible, I think, to see them come to life on screen as well and the actresses attached to the movie are phenomenal so that’s exciting! A five star read!

Margot Lee Shetterly AP Photo by Aran ShetterlyAbout Margot Lee Shetterly

Margot Lee Shetterly grew up in Hampton, Virginia, where she knew many of the women in Hidden Figures. She is an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Fellow and the recipient of a Virginia Foundation for the Humanities grant for her research on women in computing. She lives in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Find out more about Margot at her website and connect with her on Twitter.

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