Blog Tour Book Review: The Mermaid’s Daughter by Ann Claycomb

About The Mermaid’s Daughter

• Paperback: 448 pages
• Publisher: William Morrow Paperbacks (March 7, 2017)

A modern-day expansion of Hans Christian Andersen’s The Little Mermaid, this unforgettable debut novel weaves a spellbinding tale of magic and the power of love as a descendent of the original mermaid fights the terrible price of saving herself from a curse that has affected generations of women in her family.

Kathleen has always been dramatic. She suffers from the bizarre malady of experiencing stabbing pain in her feet. On her sixteenth birthday, she woke screaming from the sensation that her tongue had been cut out. No doctor can find a medical explanation for her pain, and even the most powerful drugs have proven useless. Only the touch of seawater can ease her pain, and just temporarily at that.

Now Kathleen is a twenty-five-year-old opera student in Boston and shows immense promise as a soprano. Her girlfriend Harry, a mezzo in the same program, worries endlessly about Kathleen’s phantom pain and obsession with the sea. Kathleen’s mother and grandmother both committed suicide as young women, and Harry worries they suffered from the same symptoms. When Kathleen suffers yet another dangerous breakdown, Harry convinces Kathleen to visit her hometown in Ireland to learn more about her family history.

In Ireland, they discover that the mystery—and the tragedy—of Kathleen’s family history is far older and stranger than they could have imagined.  Kathleen’s fate seems sealed, and the only way out is a terrible choice between a mermaid’s two sirens—the sea, and her lover. But both choices mean death…

Haunting and lyrical, The Mermaid’s Daughter asks—how far we will go for those we love? And can the transformative power of music overcome a magic that has prevailed for generations?

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Happy Monday!! I hope everyone had a wonderful weekend! I was actually laid up in bed for most of it, sick. Luckily I had my dog and a great book to keep me company!

Over the weekend I read The Mermaids Daughter by Ann Claycomb. I received a free copy of this book from the publisher through TLC Book Tours. 

This book tells the story of Kathleen who has been plagued by a phantom pain in her feet and her tongue since she was little. Her mother suffered from this as well, but killed herself when Kathleen was still little. Kathleen, now an adult and an opera singer, struggles with this and travels with her partner to the country of her ancestry to find out more about herself and this issue that she is having. It is the story of multiple generations of women suffering with this curse because of the decision of one woman. It is based off the Hans Christian Anderson’s Little Mermaid tale.

In this story our main character is in a relationship with Harry, a woman she met in a vocal course in college. I love their relationship dynamic and the way in which they care for each other. Harry knows about the pain Kathleen endures, she plays the dual roles of lover and caretaker for Kathleen and sort of begins the quest to find out more about Kathleen’s situation. I enjoyed the chapters we got from her perspective and seeing Kathleen and what she goes through, through her eyes. I enjoyed pretty much all of the characters in this story and I was especially intrigued by ALL of the perspectives the story is delivered from.

I loved this book immediately and could not put it down. I love dark retellings and this was definitely dark. It was dark, atmospheric, musical, and beautifully written. I felt like I was there. Kathleen’s suffering was palpable, I could almost feel it myself. Exactly how I would imagine it in our world. This was a great blend of genre – contemporary with fantasy.  The writing was gorgeous and it seemed like every sentence was evocative of the sea.

This was an excellent debut and I cannot wait to see what else this author has in store for us. Whatever it is, I will be eagerly anticipating it.

I highly recommend to everyone but especially to readers that love retellings, especially darker ones. Five stars!

 

Photo by Brian Persinger

About Ann Claycomb

Ann Claycomb’s fiction has been published in American Short Fiction, Zahir, Fiction Weekly, Brevity, Hot Metal Bridge, The Evansville Review, Title Goes Here, and other publications. She has twice been nominated for a Pushcart Prize and has an MFA in fiction from West Virginia University

Blog Tour Book Review: The Drifter by Christine Lennon

About The Drifter

• Paperback: 384 pages
• Publisher: William Morrow Paperbacks (February 14, 2017)

Megan Abbott meets M.O. Walsh in Christine Lennon’s compelling debut novel about a group of friends on the cusp of graduating from college when their lives are irrevocably changed by a brutal act of violence.

Present Day…

For two decades, Elizabeth has tried to escape the ghosts of her past…tried to erase the painful memories…tried to keep out the terrifying nightmares. But twenty years after graduating from the University of Florida, her carefully curated life begins to unravel, forcing her to confront the past she’s tried so hard to forget.

1990s, Gainesville, Florida…

Elizabeth and her two closest friends, Caroline and Ginny, are having the time of their lives in college—binge watching Oprah, flirting for freebies from Taco Bell, and breaking hearts along the way. But without warning, their world is suddenly shattered when a series of horrific acts of violence ravage the campus, changing their lives forever.

Sweeping readers from the exclusive corners of sorority life in the South to the frontlines of the drug-fueled, slacker culture in Manhattan in the ‘90s and early ‘00s, when Elizabeth is forced to acknowledge her role in the death of a friend in order to mend a broken friendship and save her own life, The Drifter is an unforgettable story about the complexities of friendships and the secrets that can ultimately destroy us.

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Happy Thursday!! It’s almost the weekend which makes me incredibly be happy because I am planning to do some well deserved reading! 

Today I am taking part in the blog tour for The Drifter by Christine Lennon. I received a free copy in exchange for my honest review of it. 

The Drifter is a thriller about a girl named Betsy who lives and goes to college in a somewhat small town. During the events of this book there is a killer on the loose in her town that is murdering young women in their apartments so it sends their campus and town into high alert.

I ended up giving this book a 3 star review. I liked it and it was certainly a little creepy in my opinion. I read the brunt of it in bed at two in the morning with all the lights off and my husband and puppy asleep so that definitely increased the creep factor for me. There were some definite creepy moments that made my skin crawl which is something I look for in a thriller read. However, it was a little slow for me. The prologue definitely caught my attention and I liked the writing style and thought it was atmospheric. I think all the sorority stuff lost me and the general girl versus girl cattiness that goes on in this book. 

I did find it interesting to explore the evolution of Betsy through time. During her college days she’s very carefree, independent and bold, but after what happens she becomes understandably fearful, dependent and protective. 

Overall it was a fast, entertaining read that thriller fans may enjoy. I recommend reading it in bed at night with the lights off (except for your reading light!)

About Christine Lennon

CHRISTINE LENNON is a Los Angeles based writer. Before she moved to the West Coast and started her freelance career, she was an editor at W, Vogue, and Harper’s Bazaar. Since then, she has written for publications including, T, the New York Times Style Magazine; the Wall Street Journal; Town & Country; W; Vogue; Harper’s Bazaar; Martha Stewart Living; Sunset; C California Style; Marie Claire; Self; Net-a-Porter’s Porter and The Edit online magazine—among others. Christine lives in California with her husband, Andrew Reich, and their twins. The Drifter is her first book.

Find out more about Christine at her website.

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Blog Tour Book Review: The Other Widow by Susan Crawford

the-other-widow-coverAbout The Other Widow

Paperback: 352 pages
Publisher:
William Morrow Paperbacks (December 6, 2016)

The author of The Pocket Wife explores the dark side of love, marriage, and infidelity in this sizzling novel of psychological suspense.

Everybody’s luck runs out. This time it could be theirs . . .

It isn’t safe. That’s what Joe tells her when he ends their affair moments before their car skids off an icy road in a blinding snowstorm and hits a tree. Desperate to keep her life intact – her job, her husband, and her precious daughter, Lily & Dorrie will do everything she can to protect herself, even if it means walking away from the wreckage. Dorrie has always been a good actress, pretending to be someone else: the dutiful daughter, the satisfied wife, the woman who can handle anything. Now she’s going to put on the most challenging performance of her life. But details about the accident leave her feeling uneasy and afraid. Why didn’t Joe’s airbag work? Why was his car door open before the EMTs arrived? And now suddenly someone is calling her from her dead lover’s burner phone. . . .

Joe’s death has left his wife in free fall as well. Karen knew Joe was cheating, she found some suspicious e-mails. Trying to cope with grief is devastating enough without the constant fear that has overtaken her, this feeling she can’t shake that someone is watching her. And with Joe gone and the kids grown, she’s vulnerable . . . and on her own.

Insurance investigator Maggie Brennan is suspicious of the latest claim that’s landed on her desk, a man dying on an icy road shortly after buying a lucrative life insurance policy. Maggie doesn’t believe in coincidences. The former cop knows that things and people are never what they seem to be.

As the fates of these three women become more tightly entwined, layers of lies and deception begin to peel away, pushing them dangerously to the edge . . . closer to each other . . . to a terrifying truth . . . to a shocking end.

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Good afternoon and welcome to my stop on the blog tour for The Other Widow by Susan Crawford. I received a copy of this book from the publisher through TLC Book Tours in exchange for my honest review.

The Other Widow is a thriller that centers around three women and an unexpected death that connects them all and leads to many unanswered questions and the uncovering of many, many lies.

I really liked the premise for this book so I was excited to read it. Thrillers, for me, tend to be pretty quick reads because I get really into them and can’t put them down until I’m finished. I read this book in a single day so it’s definitely plausible to read in one sitting. The plot itself was interesting and had many layers, which was the main thing I was excited for. I didn’t guess the whodunit right away but it did cross my mind once or twice but I sort of explained it away in my head until it was revealed. It was definitely an interesting story, it kept my interest and when I was reading at night I found myself a little more jumpy than usual while reading it.

I am giving this book a 3.5 out of 5 star rating. I liked it and enjoyed it. I am not used to the writing style so it threw me off a little while reading it. It is written with a lot of fragmented sentences which I think works for the pacing and the tone of a thriller. I don’t know if it was just me, but for some reason I wasn’t really feeling it. It took away from the story for me. I did like that the story was delivered in three perspectives, that was really enjoyable for me, getting to see the story as it unfolded through different angles. After reading this I am still a little confused over Karen and Tomas and the conclusion there. I think maybe because the ending seemed to come so fast, after the rest of the novel had sort of a slower build up since we were given time to peel back layers and work through things with the characters.

If you love thrillers, I think this one is worth a read…especially in this weather where it gets darker early and you can snuggle up in blankets with a warm drink and just read a thriller that may or may not freak you out. That’s totally what I did while reading this book!

I hope everyone is having a great week so far, happy reading everyone!

About Susan Crawford

Susan Crawford grew up in Miami, Florida, and graduated from the University of Miami with a BA in English and a minor in psychology. She later moved to New York City and then Boston before settling in Atlanta to raise three daughters and work in the field of adult education. A member of the Atlanta Writers Club and the Village Writers, Susan teaches at Georgia Piedmont Technical College and dabbles in local politics. She lives with her husband and a trio of rescue cats in Atlanta, where she enjoys reading books, writing books, rainy days, and spending time with the people she loves.

Find out more about Susan at her website, and connect with her on Facebook and Twitter.

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Blog Tour Book Review: The Boy is Back by Meg Cabot

the-boy-is-back-coverAbout The Boy is Back

• Hardcover: 368 pages
• Publisher: William Morrow (October 18, 2016)

In this brand-new novel from #1 New York Times bestselling author Meg Cabot, a scandal brings a young man back home to the small town, crazy family, and first love he left behind.

Reed Stewart thought he’d left all his small town troubles—including a broken heart—behind when he ditched tiny Bloomville, Indiana, ten years ago to become rich and famous on the professional golf circuit.  Then one tiny post on the Internet causes all of those troubles to return . . . with a vengeance.

Becky Flowers has worked hard to build her successful senior relocation business, but she’s worked even harder to forget Reed Stewart ever existed. She has absolutely no intention of seeing him when he returns—until his family hires her to save his parents.

Now Reed and Becky can’t avoid one another—or the memories of that one fateful night.  And soon everything they thought they knew about themselves (and each other) has been turned upside down, and they—and the entire town of Bloomville—might never be the same, all because The Boy Is Back.

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Happy Tuesday everyone! Welcome to my stop on the blog tour for The Boy is Back by Meg Cabot. I received this book from the publisher Harper Collins through TLC Book Tours in exchange for my honest review of it.

Truthfully I have never read a Meg Cabot book, but I have always been curious about her books because I hear so much about them. Because of that, when I had the opportunity to review a The Boy is Back I jumped at the chance to read a book from this author.

The Boy is Back is a cute contemporary about a boy and a girl who lost touch after a very eventful prom night and are thrust back together when he comes back to town to take care of family business.

This book was a lot of fun for me to read because it was told in a way that I had not previously encountered, but that I ended up loving quite a bit. The story itself is delivered through a range of media such as newspaper articles, emails, text messages, instant messaging, speech to text transcription and Facebook. This really intrigued me because I was so curious about how well the characters and the events of the story would translate to the reader through alternating media rather than traditional prose. I really, really loved it. I thought it was a really fun way to read and interact with the story. I also felt like my reading time was far less because I was sucked in to the story through the various different ways it was being told. It felt a little bit like gossiping with my best friend. It did give me some feels, especially towards the end.

I really enjoyed the actual plot, although not a  complicated one, I thought it was fun. I always heard that Meg Cabot’s books were addicting and like a sweet treat and I definitely agree. It was a cute, fun romance with a small touch of mystery and a whole lot of family drama and I was all there for it. I was impressed with how the character’s separate attitudes and personalities came through so well in a book written in the different formats but now I’m thinking that I really dig that and am looking forward to reading more books like this! I also want to read more of Meg Cabot’s book so if anyone has any recommendations on which ones to read, let me know! This book is also apparently part of a book series, although I think this is a standalone in that series (I hope that made sense). I believe the other books in the series are told in the same format so, yes, I will be reading those! I am giving this book four stars!

Also, this cover is wonderful! I really love this style of book cover!

If you are looking for a cute contemporary to enjoy or to get you out of a reading slump, check this book out!

Photo by Ali Smith

Photo by Ali Smith

About Meg Cabot

Meg Cabot was born in Bloomington, Indiana. In addition to her award-winning adult contemporary fiction, she is the author of bestselling young adult fiction, including The Princess Diaries and the Mediator series. More than twenty-five million copies of her novels for children and adults have sold worldwide. Meg lives in Key West, Florida, with her husband.

Find out more about Meg at her website, follow her blog, and connect with her on Facebook and Twitter.

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Blog Tour Book Review: Spot 12 by Jenny Jaeckel

Spot 12 coverAbout Spot 12: Five Months in the Neonatal ICU

Spot 12 delivers the gritty details of a new mother and her newborn daughter, Asa, during a five-month stay in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in this visually gripping graphic memoir by Jenny Jaeckel. A routine prenatal exam reveals a dangerous problem, and Jaeckel and her husband find themselves thrust into a world of close calls, sleepless nights, and psychological crises. Surrounded by disagreements and family tensions, death, and questions of faith, Jaeckel struggles to maintain a positive frame of mind.

Against the antiseptic, mechanical reality of the NICU, the dedicated doctors and nurses are drawn as sympathetic and wry animal characters. Doctor Eyes and Nurse Gentlehands are two of the caring individuals who do all they can to save Baby Asa. At times Jaeckel and her husband battle feelings of helplessness and despair, but their determination, hope, insight, bravery, and connection ultimately helps keep their little girl alive.

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Praise

“A memorable and beautifully executed memoir of a newborn’s difficult first months.” —Kirkus Reviews

“It’s a sad, lovely, tragic story. It reminds us how close we are to tragedy at any moment in our lives…” —Tom Hart, author of Rosalie Lightning

“Spot 12, the novel, a unique combination of text and remarkable drawings, was able to completely hold my interest. The topic of parenting a critically ill newborn in the NICU is not a new one…But Spot 12 was matchless in its comic book format associating pictures with feelings….It is very impressive.” —Anita Catlin, for Advances in Neonatal Care

Spot 12 is a graphic memoir that follows a couple who go into the hospital for an ultrasound and find out that there are complications with their baby. These complications lead to an unexpected delivery followed by months of surgeries and stress.

This was the second graphic memoir that I have read. Interestingly both are told using animals (specifically mice). I really like this aspect of it as I feel like even kids can read this book and be both interested by it but it also feels like that makes it easier for them to understand.

I thought the narrative itself was really affecting and rather beautiful. I loved the illustrations…the use of black and white only to illustrate this story was essential I think to relaying the kind of emotion that the story has. Put together I felt that the story and the illustrations both complemented and fit together so well. They made the story so easy to follow and understand and really drove home the emotion. I am not a parent myself, but I do feel as though the illustrations and narrative did a really good job of pulling me into the raw emotions of the situation. It was heartbreaking and painful seeing this child and her parent’s suffer in this book,  I can’t begin to imagine how it felt in real life.

I am giving this book a five star review, it was definitely sad in some parts and heartwarming in others. It is a super light read and I think also a thought provoking one. Graphic memoir fans may enjoy this title!

Note: I received this book from the author and TLC Book Tours in exchange for my honest review of it. Thank you for the chance to read and review this book!

Jenny JaeckelAbout Jenny Jaeckel

Jenny Jaeckel holds a Bachelor of Arts in Creative Writing from The Evergreen State College in Olympia, Washington and a Master of Arts in Hispanic Literatures from the University of Massachusetts at Amherst. She is a certified interpreter and translator (Spanish) and teaches illustration. She lives in Victoria, Vancouver Island in British Columbia with her husband and daughter.

Jaeckel is the author and illustrator of three graphic memoirs: Spot 12: Five Months in the Neonatal ICU, which won a 2008 Xeric Grant (printed in Canada, to be released in the US in 2016 in both English and Spanish), Siberiak: My Cold War Adventure on the River Ob (published in 2014), and Odd Pieces: Memoir of a Childhood (to be published in 2017). For the Love of Meat: Nine Illustrated Stories is her first collected fiction (2016).

Find out more about Jaeckel at her website, and connect with her on Twitter.

 

Blog Tour Book Review: Marrow by Elizabeth Lesser

Marrow coverAbout Marrow

• Hardcover: 320 pages
• Publisher: Harper Wave (September 20, 2016)

The author of the New York Times bestseller Broken Open returns with a visceral and profound memoir of two sisters who, in the face of a bone marrow transplant—one the donor and one the recipient—begin a quest for acceptance, authenticity, and most of all, love.

A mesmerizing and courageous memoir: the story of two sisters uncovering the depth of their love through the life-and-death experience of a bone marrow transplant. Throughout her life, Elizabeth Lesser has sought understanding about what it means to be true to oneself and, at the same time, truly connected to the ones we love. But when her sister Maggie needs a bone marrow transplant to save her life, and Lesser learns that she is the perfect match, she faces a far more immediate and complex question about what it really means to love—honestly, generously, and authentically.

Hoping to give Maggie the best chance possible for a successful transplant, the sisters dig deep into the marrow of their relationship to clear a path to unconditional acceptance. They leave the bone marrow transplant up to the doctors, but take on what Lesser calls a “soul marrow transplant,” examining their family history, having difficult conversations, examining old assumptions, and offering forgiveness until all that is left is love for each other’s true selves. Their process—before, during, and after the transplant—encourages them to take risks of authenticity in other aspects their lives.

But life does not follow the storylines we plan for it. Maggie’s body is ultimately too weak to fight the relentless illness. As she and Lesser prepare for the inevitable, they grow ever closer as their shared blood cells become a symbol of the enduring bond they share. Told with suspense and humor, Marrow is joyous and heartbreaking, incandescent and profound. The story reveals how even our most difficult experiences can offer unexpected spiritual growth. Reflecting on the multifaceted nature of love—love of other, love of self, love of the world—Marrow is an unflinching and beautiful memoir about getting to the very center of ourselves.

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Good afternoon! Welcome to my stop on the blog tour for Marrow by Elizabeth Lesser.  I received this book for review from HarperCollins and TLC Book Tours.

Marrow is a memoir about the author’s journey with her sister as her sister battles cancer. It is the story of love between sisters through an experience that is painful and brutal but that also brings them together in ways they never anticipated.

I always catch myself being surprised at how much I loved a memoir after I read it. I think I need to just come to terms with the fact that memoirs are one of my favorite genres to read. Especially when a memoir is written a certain way and teaches me something about life. Those are the best kinds of memoirs and books to read in general.

Marrow is exactly such a book. When I read the description of Marrow, I knew immediately that I wanted to read it. I am the youngest of three sisters and since this book is described as a love story between sisters, that pulled a little at my heartstrings.

This book is indeed a love story and it is a beautiful one. It’s written in this special way that I love memoirs to be written: raw, honest and deeply personal. Scattered throughout the chapters are also snippets from the authors sisters journal that chronicle her inner thoughts throughout her battle with cancer and the deepening of her relationship with her sister. It definitely made me think differently about a few things in life including my relationships , spirituality and it made me want to hug my sisters and never let them go. It was affecting and inspiring, sad and beautiful. It was truly an honor to read this book.

If you love a great memoir read or have sisters, I highly recommend giving this book a read. Five stars!

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elizabeth-lesser-apAbout Elizabeth Lesser

ELIZABETH LESSER is the author of The Seeker’s Guide and the New York Times bestseller Broken Open. She is the cofounder of Omega Institute, recognized internationally for its workshops and conferences that focus on holistic health, psychology, spirituality, creativity, and social change. Prior to her work at Omega, she was a midwife and childbirth educator. She lives in the Hudson Valley with her family.

Find out more about Elizabeth at her website, and connect with her on Facebook.

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Blog Tour Book Review: Unnatural Souls by Linda Foster

UnnaturalSoul_LindaFoster_FrontSMALL_finalTitle: Unnatural Souls  by Linda Foster
Genre: Paranormal
Length: 125 pages
Format: Ebook
Publication date:  August 2, 2016
Publisher: Glass House Press
Rating: 4/5 – I liked it alot!

It’s been almost a year since the night of the accident that should have killed Grace. Nearly a year since her brother, Ash, sold his soul to save her. She survived, but that wasn’t the end of their story.

Not even close.

In the months since, Grace’s life has turned upside down. She can move objects with her mind, teleport in a blink of an eye, see dead people … and that’s just the tip of the crazy train.

And that would be fine, really … if she had any idea how to control it.

Instead, she’s stuck in a body that does things she doesn’t understand. And now, the contract her brother made for her life is drawing to a close. Which means he’s running out of time before the demon comes to collect his soul.

Unless Grace can find a way to save him.

When an angel named Michael shows up with answers and an offer to help her, she jumps at the chance—and agrees to help him with his own mission as the price.

Then she finds out that Michael is working with another demon. That the deal she’s made … is no better than the one from which she’s trying to save Ash. And she’s faced with a choice: turn and walk away, or try to save her brother—by working with the very monsters who have nearly destroyed them both.

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It’s Friday!! Friday’s are always great and today I have the pleasure of sharing with you my review of Unnatural Souls by Linda Foster. I received a copy of Unnatural Souls from the publisher Glass House Press in exchange for an honest review of it so I’d like to send a thank you to the publisher and the author for including me in the blog tour.

Unnatural Souls is a paranormal novella about a high school aged girl named Grace who is in an unfortunate accident in which she dies for eight minutes. Within those eight minutes her younger brother makes a deal with a demon to exchange his soul for his sisters, the due date being a year after the date of the accident. When Grace wakes up she soon realizes that after her death she is not quite the same person and finds herself right in the middle of the battle between heaven and hell.

I am always up for reading some paranormal so I was really interested in reading this novella from the start. The premise caught my attention, as did the beginning of the story. Being a novella it is a very light read and since it was pretty fast paced, it kept me engaged in the story. It never fell flat for me although I definitely wish that there was more. I don’t read too many novellas so I’m not really used to their brevity but I do find that when I do read them I tend to want more, which is a good thing because that means I did enjoy the story.

I would have loved a little more detail about some of the character’s backgrounds but I am guessing that some of that will come into play in the series which makes sense to me. I liked our main character but I didn’t really connect with her too much at the beginning of the story however I did like to see her evolve a bit and find things out about herself towards the end, I think the part of the story that has to do with who/what she is becoming is going to get super interesting and I would happily read more of this world. I want to know what happens in the battle for souls in general, what happens to Ash and what the deal is with Michael. I get good guy vibes from him but I also get some bad guy vibes as well so that will be interesting to see developed. At this point I feel like the story could go in a few different directions and it left me wondering, which I think is the sign of a good story. So far there isn’t any romance in it so I thought that was great. I was left wondering though about a few characters she encounters like the ghost boy she notices at the school and Adrian, but again, I am sure my questions with those characters will be addressed in the books. I read on Goodreads that this is a prequel so I definitely think that this was a good introduction to the world and the characters that we are going to spending some time with in the series.

I recommend to YA paranomal fans, or fans of YA fiction involving angels and demons. It was a very light read in terms of size. Unnatural Souls was entertaining and fast paced, definitely something to read at night while in bed with the lights out! Looking forward to reading more!

Also can I just say that the cover is absolutely gorgeous?!

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About the Author

Linda Foster was born and raised in Colorado, where she still lives with her (very patient) husband, two (very spoiled) ferrets and (equally spoiled) dog. Linda became an avid reading enthusiast the moment she picked up her first book, and has grown steadily worse. By the time she was fifteen years old, her library had become too big for her shelves, and she was forced to donate all her books to the local school, just to make room for new ones. She started writing short novellas for her friends in middle school, and expanded into full-length novels several years later.

The Realm of the Claimed novellas are her first published work.