Blog Tour Book Review: The Mermaid’s Daughter by Ann Claycomb

About The Mermaid’s Daughter

• Paperback: 448 pages
• Publisher: William Morrow Paperbacks (March 7, 2017)

A modern-day expansion of Hans Christian Andersen’s The Little Mermaid, this unforgettable debut novel weaves a spellbinding tale of magic and the power of love as a descendent of the original mermaid fights the terrible price of saving herself from a curse that has affected generations of women in her family.

Kathleen has always been dramatic. She suffers from the bizarre malady of experiencing stabbing pain in her feet. On her sixteenth birthday, she woke screaming from the sensation that her tongue had been cut out. No doctor can find a medical explanation for her pain, and even the most powerful drugs have proven useless. Only the touch of seawater can ease her pain, and just temporarily at that.

Now Kathleen is a twenty-five-year-old opera student in Boston and shows immense promise as a soprano. Her girlfriend Harry, a mezzo in the same program, worries endlessly about Kathleen’s phantom pain and obsession with the sea. Kathleen’s mother and grandmother both committed suicide as young women, and Harry worries they suffered from the same symptoms. When Kathleen suffers yet another dangerous breakdown, Harry convinces Kathleen to visit her hometown in Ireland to learn more about her family history.

In Ireland, they discover that the mystery—and the tragedy—of Kathleen’s family history is far older and stranger than they could have imagined.  Kathleen’s fate seems sealed, and the only way out is a terrible choice between a mermaid’s two sirens—the sea, and her lover. But both choices mean death…

Haunting and lyrical, The Mermaid’s Daughter asks—how far we will go for those we love? And can the transformative power of music overcome a magic that has prevailed for generations?

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Happy Monday!! I hope everyone had a wonderful weekend! I was actually laid up in bed for most of it, sick. Luckily I had my dog and a great book to keep me company!

Over the weekend I read The Mermaids Daughter by Ann Claycomb. I received a free copy of this book from the publisher through TLC Book Tours. 

This book tells the story of Kathleen who has been plagued by a phantom pain in her feet and her tongue since she was little. Her mother suffered from this as well, but killed herself when Kathleen was still little. Kathleen, now an adult and an opera singer, struggles with this and travels with her partner to the country of her ancestry to find out more about herself and this issue that she is having. It is the story of multiple generations of women suffering with this curse because of the decision of one woman. It is based off the Hans Christian Anderson’s Little Mermaid tale.

In this story our main character is in a relationship with Harry, a woman she met in a vocal course in college. I love their relationship dynamic and the way in which they care for each other. Harry knows about the pain Kathleen endures, she plays the dual roles of lover and caretaker for Kathleen and sort of begins the quest to find out more about Kathleen’s situation. I enjoyed the chapters we got from her perspective and seeing Kathleen and what she goes through, through her eyes. I enjoyed pretty much all of the characters in this story and I was especially intrigued by ALL of the perspectives the story is delivered from.

I loved this book immediately and could not put it down. I love dark retellings and this was definitely dark. It was dark, atmospheric, musical, and beautifully written. I felt like I was there. Kathleen’s suffering was palpable, I could almost feel it myself. Exactly how I would imagine it in our world. This was a great blend of genre – contemporary with fantasy.  The writing was gorgeous and it seemed like every sentence was evocative of the sea.

This was an excellent debut and I cannot wait to see what else this author has in store for us. Whatever it is, I will be eagerly anticipating it.

I highly recommend to everyone but especially to readers that love retellings, especially darker ones. Five stars!

 

Photo by Brian Persinger

About Ann Claycomb

Ann Claycomb’s fiction has been published in American Short Fiction, Zahir, Fiction Weekly, Brevity, Hot Metal Bridge, The Evansville Review, Title Goes Here, and other publications. She has twice been nominated for a Pushcart Prize and has an MFA in fiction from West Virginia University

Blog Tour Book Review: The Mermaids of Lake Michigan by Suzanne Kamata

About The Mermaids of Lake Michigan

  • Paperback
  • Publisher: Wyatt-MacKenzie Publishing (February 14, 2017)

Elise Faulkner is more at home in the waters of her beloved Lake Michigan than on land where her beauty queen mom is always on her back about her lack of a social life; her sister is dating the boy of her dreams; her favorite penpal–the one who wrote about mermaids in Ghana–has gotten married and ended their correspondence; and no one’s allowed to talk about her glamorous great-grandmother, the deep-sea wreck diver. Elise is biding her time with books until she can flee. But then crazy Chiara Hanover pops into her life, as does Miguel, a mysterious carnival worker whose dark future has been predicted by a gypsy.

 

“A lyrical, compelling coming-of-age story with magical elements.” — Kirkus Reviews

“Elise Faulkner drew me into her head and heart so subtly, yet with such force, that by the end I was cheering her on. Suzanne Kamata has woven an honest, aching coming-of-age story that will speak to women everywhere.” ?Kristin Bair O’Keeffe, author of The Art of Floating and Thirsty

“Suzanne Kamata has written a novel of great charm and depth, with a bit of magical realism laced with humor. Elise, its engaging narrator opens her arms and her heart to life’s complexity, including family secrets and escapades with a magnificent new bestie–the irrepressible Chiara. When an unlikely romance unfolds with a mysterious drifter/musician, Kamata steers us expertly into darker waters. A jewel of a novel, set on the shores of Lake Michigan with Kamata’s signature compassion for all of its characters.” — Margaret Willey, author of Summer of the Silk Moths

“The Mermaids of Lake Michigan is a luminous coming-of-age story about a teen struggling against social norms and her own family legacy to find her way. Elise’s journey is hardly the stuff of fairy tales, as she ends up far from home, and far from the self she meant to be. Raw, real and even a bit magical.” — Kristina Riggle, author of The Life You’ve Imagined and Vivian in Red

“Suzanne Kamata’s new novel, The Mermaids of Lake Michigan, is a beautiful story about a teenage girl who must learn to balance her idealism and belief in mermaids with the harsh realities of growing up and trying to find people to love and trust. A page-turner set in the unstable years of the 1970s, I devoured it in one sitting. It brought back memories of my own adolescence and took me beyond, in that way all good novels do, into the wonderings of circumstance and the choices we would make if faced with hard decisions. Suitable for teens and adults alike, this novel will teach readers to believe in magic even in the face of tragedy.” — Cassie Premo Steele, author of Beautiful Waters

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Hello all! Welcome to my stop on the blog tour for The Mermaids of Lake Michigan by Suzanne Kamata. I received a free copy of this book in exchange for an honest review of it.

The Mermaids of Lake Michigan is a coming of age story about a young girl named Elise. She is an introverted bookworm until she meets Chiara, someone who challenges her to be different and to push her own boundaries. When she sees a handsome stranger at a carnival and runs into him days after, it seems like fate and through her experiences with these two people, her life is never again the same.

The Mermaids of Lake Michigan and how much I liked it, was a surprise for me. It is super short in length and when I held it in my hands I was nervous for it because of the length as some shorter books feel like they should be longer but I really felt like this book and these characters accomplished so much in so short a page length.  

The writing was beautiful and gripped me from the very beginning. There were a few paragraphs and dialogue sentences that I just had to read over and over because of how beautiful they were and how they made me feel about the characters. It definitely has a “coming of age” story feel right off the bat and I really enjoyed that as well as the atmosphere of it being set in the 70s. That was really evident in the narrative and the writing made it just so easy to be transported to that time frame, I could almost see the clothes, hear the music, feel the heartbreak and the friendships.

I literally read this in a day, really enjoyed it and recommend it if you’re looking for a really short read that packs a pretty nice punch of a story. I enjoyed this so much, it was super relatable and evoked feelings from my own childhood/teenage years when you are just finding yourself and who you are going to become. If you like coming of age stories, this may be to your liking! Four stars!

About Suzanne Kamata

Suzanne Kamata was born and raised in Grand Haven, Michigan. She is most recently from Lexington, South Carolina, and now lives in Tokushima Prefecture, Japan with her husband and two children. Her short stories, essays, articles and book reviews have appeared in over 100 publications including Real Simple, Brain, Child, Crab Orchard Review, and The Japan Times. Her work has been nominated for the Pushcart Prize five times, and received a Special Mention in 2006. She is also a two-time winner of the All Nippon Airways/ Wingspan Fiction Contest, winner of the Paris Book Festival Award, and winner of the Half the World Global Literati Award for the novel.

Connect with Suzanne

Website | Twitter

Blog Tour Book Review: The Other Widow by Susan Crawford

the-other-widow-coverAbout The Other Widow

Paperback: 352 pages
Publisher:
William Morrow Paperbacks (December 6, 2016)

The author of The Pocket Wife explores the dark side of love, marriage, and infidelity in this sizzling novel of psychological suspense.

Everybody’s luck runs out. This time it could be theirs . . .

It isn’t safe. That’s what Joe tells her when he ends their affair moments before their car skids off an icy road in a blinding snowstorm and hits a tree. Desperate to keep her life intact – her job, her husband, and her precious daughter, Lily & Dorrie will do everything she can to protect herself, even if it means walking away from the wreckage. Dorrie has always been a good actress, pretending to be someone else: the dutiful daughter, the satisfied wife, the woman who can handle anything. Now she’s going to put on the most challenging performance of her life. But details about the accident leave her feeling uneasy and afraid. Why didn’t Joe’s airbag work? Why was his car door open before the EMTs arrived? And now suddenly someone is calling her from her dead lover’s burner phone. . . .

Joe’s death has left his wife in free fall as well. Karen knew Joe was cheating, she found some suspicious e-mails. Trying to cope with grief is devastating enough without the constant fear that has overtaken her, this feeling she can’t shake that someone is watching her. And with Joe gone and the kids grown, she’s vulnerable . . . and on her own.

Insurance investigator Maggie Brennan is suspicious of the latest claim that’s landed on her desk, a man dying on an icy road shortly after buying a lucrative life insurance policy. Maggie doesn’t believe in coincidences. The former cop knows that things and people are never what they seem to be.

As the fates of these three women become more tightly entwined, layers of lies and deception begin to peel away, pushing them dangerously to the edge . . . closer to each other . . . to a terrifying truth . . . to a shocking end.

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Good afternoon and welcome to my stop on the blog tour for The Other Widow by Susan Crawford. I received a copy of this book from the publisher through TLC Book Tours in exchange for my honest review.

The Other Widow is a thriller that centers around three women and an unexpected death that connects them all and leads to many unanswered questions and the uncovering of many, many lies.

I really liked the premise for this book so I was excited to read it. Thrillers, for me, tend to be pretty quick reads because I get really into them and can’t put them down until I’m finished. I read this book in a single day so it’s definitely plausible to read in one sitting. The plot itself was interesting and had many layers, which was the main thing I was excited for. I didn’t guess the whodunit right away but it did cross my mind once or twice but I sort of explained it away in my head until it was revealed. It was definitely an interesting story, it kept my interest and when I was reading at night I found myself a little more jumpy than usual while reading it.

I am giving this book a 3.5 out of 5 star rating. I liked it and enjoyed it. I am not used to the writing style so it threw me off a little while reading it. It is written with a lot of fragmented sentences which I think works for the pacing and the tone of a thriller. I don’t know if it was just me, but for some reason I wasn’t really feeling it. It took away from the story for me. I did like that the story was delivered in three perspectives, that was really enjoyable for me, getting to see the story as it unfolded through different angles. After reading this I am still a little confused over Karen and Tomas and the conclusion there. I think maybe because the ending seemed to come so fast, after the rest of the novel had sort of a slower build up since we were given time to peel back layers and work through things with the characters.

If you love thrillers, I think this one is worth a read…especially in this weather where it gets darker early and you can snuggle up in blankets with a warm drink and just read a thriller that may or may not freak you out. That’s totally what I did while reading this book!

I hope everyone is having a great week so far, happy reading everyone!

About Susan Crawford

Susan Crawford grew up in Miami, Florida, and graduated from the University of Miami with a BA in English and a minor in psychology. She later moved to New York City and then Boston before settling in Atlanta to raise three daughters and work in the field of adult education. A member of the Atlanta Writers Club and the Village Writers, Susan teaches at Georgia Piedmont Technical College and dabbles in local politics. She lives with her husband and a trio of rescue cats in Atlanta, where she enjoys reading books, writing books, rainy days, and spending time with the people she loves.

Find out more about Susan at her website, and connect with her on Facebook and Twitter.

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Blog Tour Book Review: Say Goodbye for Now by Catherine Ryan Hyde

thumbnail_516dduv1x4l-_sx332_bo1204203200_About Say Goodbye for Now

Paperback: 364 pages

Publisher: Lake Union Publishing (December 13, 2016)

On an isolated Texas ranch, Dr. Lucy cares for abandoned animals. The solitude allows her to avoid the people and places that remind her of the past. Not that any of the townsfolk care. In 1959, no one is interested in a woman doctor. Nor are they welcoming Calvin and Justin Bell, a newly arrived African American father and son.

When Pete Solomon, a neglected twelve-year-old boy, and Justin bring a wounded wolf-dog hybrid to Dr. Lucy, the outcasts soon find refuge in one another. Lucy never thought she’d make connections again, never mind fall in love. Pete never imagined he’d find friends as loyal as Justin and the dog. But these four people aren’t allowed to be friends, much less a family, when the whole town turns violently against them.

With heavy hearts, Dr. Lucy and Pete say goodbye to Calvin and Justin. But through the years they keep hope alive…waiting for the world to catch up with them.

“[A] heartwarming tale of transgression and redemption.” Kirkus Reviews

“A moving story about patience, trust, the families we choose, and the love it takes to let somebody go.” —Booklist

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Happy Monday! Welcome to my stop on the blog tour for Say Goodbye For Now  by Catherine Ryan Hyde. I received a copy of this book from the publisher through TLC Book Tours in exchange for an honest review of it.

Say Goodbye for Now is told in the dual perspectives of Dr. Lucy who is a retired doctor who lives a pretty reclusive life in the country fixing injured animals and the occasional injured human and Pete, a young boy who befriends Dr. Lucy when he takes an injured wolf hybrid to her for emergency care.

I was drawn to this book first of all, because there is a dog on the cover. I have said time and time again that a book cover that features some sort of animal on it will always reel me in. This cover was no different. I usually like to skip reading the book synopsis so I can go into books without expectations or being slightly spoiled on their plots and I definitely did that was this one so I wasn’t sure what to expect when I picked this book up.

I ended up really enjoying it. I loved the writing, which to me was simple in a very beautiful way. I loved the characters – specifically Dr. Lucy, Pete, Calvin, Justin and of course the plethora of animals we encounter in the story (especially Prince) and what they all learn from each other. There were alot of heavy, really interesting topics brought up in the story that I thought were handled really well and made the story just very real, tragic and also, touching. It dealt with the subjects of racism, child abuse, friendship, family and also, compassion both for animals and for our fellow human beings.

I am giving this book five stars. I loved it. It gave me so many feelings – dread, wamth, sadness…just a whole spectrum of feelings that I didn’t really expect. I could not put this book down and ended up reading it in a day.

thumbnail_unknown-2About Catherine Ryan Hyde

Catherine Ryan Hyde is the author of thirty published and forthcoming books. Her bestselling 1999 novel Pay It Forward, adapted into a major Warner Bros. motion picture starring Kevin Spacey and Helen Hunt, made the American Library Association’s Best Books for Young Adults list and was translated into more than two dozen languages for distribution in more than thirty countries. Her novels Becoming Chloe and Jumpstart the World were included on the ALA’s Rainbow List; Jumpstart the World was also a finalist for two Lambda Literary Awards and won Rainbow Awards in two categories. More than fifty of her short stories have been published in many journals, including the Antioch Review, Michigan Quarterly Review, the Virginia Quarterly Review, Ploughshares, Glimmer Train, and the Sun, and in the anthologiesSanta Barbara Stories and California Shorts and the bestselling anthology Dog Is My Co-Pilot. Her short fiction received honorable mention in the Raymond Carver Short Story Contest, a second-place win for the Tobias Wolff Award, and nominations for Best American Short Stories, the O. Henry Award, and the Pushcart Prize. Three have also been cited in Best American Short Stories.

Ryan Hyde is also founder and former president of the Pay It Forward Foundation. As a professional public speaker, she has addressed the National Conference on Education, twice spoken at Cornell University, met with AmeriCorps members at the White House, and shared a dais with Bill Clinton.

Connect with Catherine Ryan Hyde

Website | Blog |Facebook | Twitter

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Blog Tour Book Review: Hidden Figures by Margot Lee Shetterly

hidden-figures-pb-coverAbout Hidden Figures

• Paperback: 368 pages
• Publisher: William Morrow Paperbacks (December 6, 2016)

The phenomenal true story of the black female mathematicians at NASA whose calculations helped fuel some of America’s greatest achievements in space. Soon to be a major motion picture starring Taraji P. Henson, Octavia Spencer, Janelle Monae, Kirsten Dunst, and Kevin Costner.

Before John Glenn orbited the earth, or Neil Armstrong walked on the moon, a group of dedicated female mathematicians known as “human computers” used pencils, slide rules and adding machines to calculate the numbers that would launch rockets, and astronauts, into space.

Among these problem-solvers were a group of exceptionally talented African American women, some of the brightest minds of their generation. Originally relegated to teaching math in the South’s segregated public schools, they were called into service during the labor shortages of World War II, when America’s aeronautics industry was in dire need of anyone who had the right stuff. Suddenly, these overlooked math whizzes had a shot at jobs worthy of their skills, and they answered Uncle Sam’s call, moving to Hampton, Virginia and the fascinating, high-energy world of the Langley Memorial Aeronautical Laboratory.

Even as Virginia’s Jim Crow laws required them to be segregated from their white counterparts, the women of Langley’s all-black “West Computing” group helped America achieve one of the things it desired most: a decisive victory over the Soviet Union in the Cold War, and complete domination of the heavens.

Starting in World War II and moving through to the Cold War, the Civil Rights Movement and the Space Race, Hidden Figures follows the interwoven accounts of Dorothy Vaughan, Mary Jackson, Katherine Johnson and Christine Darden, four African American women who participated in some of NASA’s greatest successes. It chronicles their careers over nearly three decades they faced challenges, forged alliances and used their intellect to change their own lives, and their country’s future.

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Hello everyone, happy Wednesday! Thanks for stopping in on my stop for the blog tour for Hidden Numbers. I received a copy from the publisher through TLC Book Tours in exchange for an honest review. 

Hidden Numbers is a nonfiction work that tells the story of a group of African American women whom worked for NASA as mathematicians. Their story has been a lesser known story even though they played such a pivotal, important role in United States space exploration history, literally calculating the trajectories that sent astronauts into space. 

When I first signed up to take part in this tour, I had no clue that a film was coming out based on this book and the work of these amazing women.  I ended up seeing the trailer randomly and it floored me! How had I never known this essential part of history?!

I loved this book. Not only did I learn a lot while reading it, it was also very inspiring and moving. It’s evident in the writing and the detail included how much research went into this book and the result is an in depth look at a piece of history that we didn’t know we were missing but are so glad to have brought to light. There were so many different interesting aspects of this book. These women are incredible and brave, as are each of their stories. They were women working in a male dominated industry at a time when that wasn’t really done, especially in that particular industry. Not only were they women but they were also black women and this was during the time of the civil rights movement, so with just those two key pieces of information you can see just how important and awesome their work and their situation was. 

I am so glad that I read this book and I recommend it to everyone. It’s such an important piece of history, and it’s just fascinating to read about what these women did…I mean without them many things would not have been possible and it’s extremely maddening that their story is barely coming to light and I can’t wait to see the movie based on this book. These women definitely came alive through the pages of this book so it will be incredible, I think, to see them come to life on screen as well and the actresses attached to the movie are phenomenal so that’s exciting! A five star read!

Margot Lee Shetterly AP Photo by Aran ShetterlyAbout Margot Lee Shetterly

Margot Lee Shetterly grew up in Hampton, Virginia, where she knew many of the women in Hidden Figures. She is an Alfred P. Sloan Foundation Fellow and the recipient of a Virginia Foundation for the Humanities grant for her research on women in computing. She lives in Charlottesville, Virginia.

Find out more about Margot at her website and connect with her on Twitter.

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Blog Tour Book Review: Just Fine with Caroline by Annie England Noblin

just-fine-with-caroline-coverAbout Just Fine With Caroline

• Paperback: 368 pages
• Publisher: William Morrow Paperbacks (October 11, 2016)

From the author of Sit! Stay! Speak! comes a tender, terrific novel complete with long-buried secrets, a three-legged pot belly pig, and an irresistible dog—an unforgettable story about love, friendship, and community. Perfect for fans of Mary Kay Andrews and Mary Alice Monroe.

Caroline O’Connor never dreamed she’d be back home in Cold River, Missouri, the Ozark Mountain town where everyone is ‘up your business.’…they mean well as they drive you crazy. She thought she’d left town for good, but now she’s back, helping to care for her New York born mother—struck with Alzheimer’s, and prone to saying and doing anything—and her father, the beloved local doctor frustrated he can’t cure his own wife.

As for Caroline, she’s doing ‘just fine’ coping with her parents, her brazen cousin Ava Dawn’s marital disasters, her mostly-deaf dog…and with Noah Cranwell, far-flung relative of a local family mostly infamous for running moonshine, an ex-veteran who’s come to Cold River with troubles of his own.

Caroline believes she knows everything about Cold River and the people who live in its hills and hollers … but sometimes life’s greatest surprises happen closest to home.

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Thank you to the author, TLC Book Tours and the publisher Harper Collins for giving me the chance to read this book in exchange for my honest review of it.

Just Fine with Caroline is the second book I have read and reviewed from Annie England Noblin. You can read my review of her debut novel here: Sit! Stay! Speak! 

This book is about Caroline, a young woman who finds herself back in her hometown working in her family’s shop and taking care of her mother who is struggling with Alzheimer’s and her adorable, deaf dog Yara. Though not what she had initially envisioned her life to be like, Caroline is content in the town where everyone knows your business and newcomers aren’t exactly welcome. But Caroline soon finds out that even small towns have their secrets.

I really enjoyed this book and the feel of the setting. I love the small town vibe and the secrets that lie beneath the surface, in the history of the people there. 

What I loved most about this book were the many characters involved in it. I thought they all had such vibrant personalities and individual histories. It was fun to see them interacting with each other and to learn more about all of their lives and how they intertwine. The small town setting where everyone knows everyone was really fun, I just realized that I am a fan of books that are set in this type of setting. It made the book feel familiar and somewhat cozy to me.

I’ve said it before and I will say again, put a dog on the cover or in a story and you will have my heart. I am such a sucker for this type of marketing lol. I can’t control it. I am definitely a sucker also for how the author writes dogs in her stories. For me, this story was centered more on the people in the story though while her debut novel featured a dog that was more of a prominent character in that story so I guess I was expecting the dog in this one to be a more prominent character as well. But that’s okay, I still really really enjoyed this book and am giving it a four star review. It’s official, after two hits with me I am a Annie England Noblin fan and am looking forward to reading more in this series and just more of her writing in general. She is an ace at lovely, contemporary stories that are at the same time cozy and thought provoking. She usually deals with heavy subjects in her books but manages to also keep the story light and fun with some really good romance. Check this one out!

 

Annie England NoblinAbout Annie England Noblin

Annie England Noblin lives with her son, husband, and three dogs in the Missouri Ozarks. She graduated with an M.A. in creative writing from Missouri State University and currently teaches English and communications for Arkansas State University in Mountain Home, Arkansas. She spends her free time playing make-believe, feeding stray cats, and working with animal shelters across the country to save homeless dogs.

Connect with Annie on Facebook and Twitter.

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Blog Tour Book Review: Yesternight by Cat Winters

yesternight-coverAbout Yesternight

� Paperback: 400 pages
� Publisher: William Morrow Paperbacks (October 4, 2016)

From the author of The Uninvited comes a haunting historical novel with a compelling mystery at its core.� A young child psychologist steps off a train, her destination a foggy seaside town. There, she begins a journey causing her to question everything she believes about life, death, memories, and reincarnation.

In 1925, Alice Lind steps off a train in the rain-soaked coastal hamlet of Gordon Bay, Oregon. There, she expects to do nothing more difficult than administer IQ tests to a group of rural schoolchildren. A trained psychologist, Alice believes mysteries of the mind can be unlocked scientifically, but now her views are about to be challenged by one curious child.

Seven-year-old Janie O�Daire is a mathematical genius, which is surprising. But what is disturbing are the stories she tells: that her name was once Violet, she grew up in Kansas decades earlier, and she drowned at age nineteen. Alice delves into these stories, at first believing they�re no more than the product of the girl�s vast imagination.� But, slowly, Alice comes to the realization that Janie might indeed be telling a strange truth.

Alice knows the investigation may endanger her already shaky professional reputation, and as a woman in a field dominated by men she has no room for mistakes. But she is unprepared for the ways it will illuminate terrifying mysteries within her own past, and in the process, irrevocably change her life.

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Happy Tuesday everyone! I am happy to bring you my review of Yesternight by Cat Winters. I received this book from the publisher Harper Collins through TLC Book Tours in exchange for my honest review of it.

Yesternight is a historical fiction story about a young trained psychologist, Alice Lind, who travels the country testing children’s educational aptitude for the department of education. On her current assignment she meets an extraordinary young girl who seems to have the knowledge and memory of someone twice her age, quite literally claiming to have lived another life. Meeting her sends Alice on a hunt for answers, not only for the child and her family, but also for herself.

Yesternight wasn’t quite what I was expected it to be, which turned out to be a wonderfully good thing. I definitely wasn’t expecting to react to it the way I did. When I finally read this book, it had been months since I had last read the synopsis so I went into my read of it with fresh eyes and no clue as to what to expect, other than the front cover as a clue. I was way off judging from the cover. I expected a women’s historical fiction book. While I definitely got that in this book, it was actually so much more than that. It was unexpectedly creepy, which was awesome for an October read! I don’t know if this book was meant to be chilling and suspenseful but I read this book between the hours of 12 and 4 in the morning with the rest of the house asleep and all the lights off (except my handy dandy book light) and it was definitely a bit creepy! Aside from that, this was a wonderful read. It definitely dealt in the realm of women’s fiction as our main character, Alice, is  working in a predominantly male profession and is struggling with the preferential treatment of men in her field and in academia. She is very much an independent, modern woman in command of her own sexuality which I loved to see in this book.

I just really loved that this story was so layered. We have that women’s fiction layer but deeper than that there is this mystery/thriller beneath the surface that I did not expect but was fascinated by. This was a thrilling, entertaining story that I would highly recommend to historical fiction or mystery fans alike. Loved this book, I could not put it down! A five star read!

Photo by Tara Kelly

Photo by Tara Kelly

About Cat Winters

Cat Winters’s debut novel, In the Shadow of Blackbirds, was released to widespread critical acclaim. The novel has been named a finalist for the 2014 Morris Award, a�School Library Journal Best Book of 2013, and a Booklist 2013 Top 10 Horror Fiction for Youth. Winters lives in Portland, Oregon, with her husband and two children.

Find out more about Cat at her website, and follow her on tumblr, Pinterest, Instagram,�Facebook, and Twitter.

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